Love: It’s Not What You Think

Love is the stillness between thoughts.

Love is the safe space of wisdom.

Love is the clear light of creativity.

Love is the gentle attendant of fearlessness.

Love is the greatest gift of humanity.

Love generates the ideas that transform us and bring us peace.

Love recedes in the face of fear, but it does not disappear. It lodges deep in our hearts and faithfully awaits the moment of silence into which it will re-emerge.

When we open ourselves for even a moment to that silence, love never sleeps through it. Love shines into our minds and illuminates hope and possibility.

Love is the constant current that flows eternally beneath the turmoil of our thinking, the perfectly reliable movement stirring us to find comfort in the fluidity of life without getting distracted by the ups or downs.

No matter what we think about it, no matter the words we use, love is not what we think or what we say. Love is a spiritual force, the deep aliveness that is the essence of being before we think about it.

We are born in love. Just look at the innocent, bright-eyed curiosity and enthusiasm on any small child’s face, and you see that pure love. It is neither conditional nor specific. It is just unfettered engagement in life flowing through each person, most obvious before it is papered over by personal thinking.

We know it is at the heart of human experience because it is, and has always been, at the foundation of every significant religious framework we have known. It is the common good at the core of the experience of mankind. It is who we are before we think about who we are. It is the beautiful feeling most natural to us, before we learn to use our own power to think to fill our lives with the infinitude of possible experiences.

Love is like the pilot light of our emotional life. Feed it, and it burns where we need it. Starve it, and it flickers on, always ready, always there, always and ever the resource we have whenever we seek it.

We can turn our backs on love and nurture our personal emotional thinking whenever, and for however long, we choose. But as soon as we let it pass and look to quiet, love comes to light again. Love soothes us and draws us back into the dance of life, the easy movement with and around the other dancers, feeling the music of our common heartbeat and the joy of moving freely through time.

The Principles lead us back to love, to the purity of thought which offers us a non-judgmental fresh start moment-to-moment-to-moment. More and more people across the globe are drawn to see them at work behind life — the formless energy of mind pulsing through infinitude, the individual ability to think allowing each of us to make up whatever we want, the power of consciousness bringing those thoughts to awareness as our individual realities. More and more people are realizing that pure formless energy is love, and love is always the answer.

My love is like a red, red rose;

Its fragrance fills the air;

It guides me to a place of light,

Instead of dark despair.

                                                                                                                                   Sydney Banks

 

It is a good time in history to ask people to re-read the whole chapter on Love and Forgiveness in Sydney Banks’ The Missing Link., pp. 117-124.

As Mr. Banks reminded us, “A mind full of love and good feelings can never go wrong.”

 

The post Love: It’s Not What You Think appeared first on Three Principles Living.

Love: It’s Not What You Think

Love is the stillness between thoughts.

Love is the safe space of wisdom.

Love is the clear light of creativity.

Love is the gentle attendant of fearlessness.

Love is the greatest gift of humanity.

Love generates the ideas that transform us and bring us peace.

Love recedes in the face of fear, but it does not disappear. It lodges deep in our hearts and faithfully awaits the moment of silence into which it will re-emerge.

When we open ourselves for even a moment to that silence, love never sleeps through it. Love shines into our minds and illuminates hope and possibility.

Love is the constant current that flows eternally beneath the turmoil of our thinking, the perfectly reliable movement stirring us to find comfort in the fluidity of life without getting distracted by the ups or downs.

No matter what we think about it, no matter the words we use, love is not what we think or what we say. Love is a spiritual force, the deep aliveness that is the essence of being before we think about it.

We are born in love. Just look at the innocent, bright-eyed curiosity and enthusiasm on any small child’s face, and you see that pure love. It is neither conditional nor specific. It is just unfettered engagement in life flowing through each person, most obvious before it is papered over by personal thinking.

We know it is at the heart of human experience because it is, and has always been, at the foundation of every significant religious framework we have known. It is the common good at the core of the experience of mankind. It is who we are before we think about who we are. It is the beautiful feeling most natural to us, before we learn to use our own power to think to fill our lives with the infinitude of possible experiences.

Love is like the pilot light of our emotional life. Feed it, and it burns where we need it. Starve it, and it flickers on, always ready, always there, always and ever the resource we have whenever we seek it.

We can turn our backs on love and nurture our personal emotional thinking whenever, and for however long, we choose. But as soon as we let it pass and look to quiet, love comes to light again. Love soothes us and draws us back into the dance of life, the easy movement with and around the other dancers, feeling the music of our common heartbeat and the joy of moving freely through time.

The Principles lead us back to love, to the purity of thought which offers us a non-judgmental fresh start moment-to-moment-to-moment. More and more people across the globe are drawn to see them at work behind life — the formless energy of mind pulsing through infinitude, the individual ability to think allowing each of us to make up whatever we want, the power of consciousness bringing those thoughts to awareness as our individual realities. More and more people are realizing that pure formless energy is love, and love is always the answer.

My love is like a red, red rose;

Its fragrance fills the air;

It guides me to a place of light,

Instead of dark despair.

                                                                                                                                   Sydney Banks

 

It is a good time in history to ask people to re-read the whole chapter on Love and Forgiveness in Sydney Banks’ The Missing Link., pp. 117-124.

As Mr. Banks reminded us, “A mind full of love and good feelings can never go wrong.”

 

The post Love: It’s Not What You Think appeared first on Three Principles Living.

Love: It’s Not What You Think

 

Love is the stillness between thoughts.

Love is the safe space of wisdom.

Love is the clear light of creativity.

Love is the gentle attendant of fearlessness.

Love is the greatest gift of humanity.

Love generates the ideas that transform us and bring us peace.

Love recedes in the face of fear, but it does not disappear. It lodges deep in our hearts and faithfully awaits the moment of silence into which it will re-emerge.

When we open ourselves for even a moment to that silence, love never sleeps through it. Love shines into our minds and illuminates hope and possibility.

Love is the constant current that flows eternally beneath the turmoil of our thinking, the perfectly reliable movement stirring us to find comfort in the fluidity of life without getting distracted by the ups or downs.

No matter what we think about it, no matter the words we use, love is not what we think or what we say. Love is a spiritual force, the deep aliveness that is the essence of being before we think about it.

We are born in love. Just look at the innocent, bright-eyed curiosity and enthusiasm on any small child’s face, and you see that pure love. It is neither conditional nor specific. It is just unfettered engagement in life flowing through each person, most obvious before it is papered over by personal thinking.

We know it is at the heart of human experience because it is, and has always been, at the foundation of every significant religious framework we have known. It is the common good at the core of the experience of mankind. It is who we are before we think about who we are. It is the beautiful feeling most natural to us, before we learn to use our own power to think to fill our lives with the infinitude of possible experiences.

Love is like the pilot light of our emotional life. Feed it, and it burns where we need it. Starve it, and it flickers on, always ready, always there, always and ever the resource we have whenever we seek it.

We can turn our backs on love and nurture our personal emotional thinking whenever, and for however long, we choose. But as soon as we let it pass and look to quiet, love comes to light again. Love soothes us and draws us back into the dance of life, the easy movement with and around the other dancers, feeling the music of our common heartbeat and the joy of moving freely through time.

The Principles lead us back to love, to the purity of thought which offers us a non-judgmental fresh start moment-to-moment-to-moment. More and more people across the globe are drawn to see them at work behind life — the formless energy of mind pulsing through infinitude, the individual ability to think allowing each of us to make up whatever we want, the power of consciousness bringing those thoughts to awareness as our individual realities. More and more people are realizing that pure formless energy is love, and love is always the answer.

Photo by Robert Scott https://www.flickr.com/photos/zackie/6045641820

My love is like a red, red rose;

Its fragrance fills the air;

It guides me to a place of light,

Instead of dark despair.

                                                                                                                                   Sydney Banks

 

It is a good time in history to ask people to re-read the whole chapter on Love and Forgiveness in Sydney Banks’ The Missing Link., pp. 117-124.

As Mr. Banks reminded us, “A mind full of love and good feelings can never go wrong.”

 

The post Love: It’s Not What You Think appeared first on Three Principles Living.

One Problem; One Solution

A beautiful thing happened the last weekend in May, thanks to those with the vision to hold the first “One Solution” conference in Oslo, Norway. In one weekend, they elevated onto the world stage the absolute simplicity and power of the answer offered by a true understanding of how the mind works.

Although I could not attend because of a commitment, I watched what I could of the live stream, and, on the very first night, I had an Aha! moment about all of us (“all of us” being the handful of people who started the work of bringing the Three Principles into all walks of life back in the mid-70’s up through the tens of thousands involved in the work globally today.) For all these years, we’ve been compartmentalized, and when we tried to generalize, we were treated as “pollyanna,” or “naive,” or claiming the impossible. We live in a world in which there is currently no vision for the true meaning of underlying Principles that explain all human experience, that define all human beings as operating the same way at the core, regardless of their differences. So we have hundreds of diagnoses and treatments for all kinds of mental illness; many approaches to many different business problems; separate ideas about how to treat a variety of social justice issues; fragmented approaches to addressing dysfunctional institutions and organizations depending on their size, purpose, culture, location, etc. “All of us” knew from the beginning there was one underlying problem and one underlying solution, but because we were coming at our individual work from our own particular professional interests, the overwhelming significance of the fact that we were all addressing the exact same solution to all the problems was invisible to others.

Consider, for example, the difference between the way we think about Psychology and the way we think about Geometry. No matter what language, culture, environment, situation in which a problem is being addressed by geometry, everyone understands geometry precisely the same way. The principles of Geometry apply across the board, whether you are developing an architectural plan, designing a work of art, creating a fabric pattern, imagining a virtual reality, expanding nanotechnology, or building a sand castle. No one argues whether there are unique rules of geometry that apply differently to different situations. You are working with the same set of assumptions and facts to solve infinite problems. It is implicitly understood that the Principles of Geometry are constants; the variables are the infinite situations in which they can be applied.

The One Solution conference brought to the foreground that, with an understanding of the Principles underlying the human experience, it doesn’t matter what the problem is, the solution is the same, and there is one solution to all of humanity’s problems. Put another way, humanity created the problems; humanity contains the solution to all of them. It took the 30,000-foot view; from there, you lose the details and you can see the outlines.

It absolutely does not matter what problem is being addressed; the solution is one very simple thing: recognize the operating Principles behind all human thinking and experience.

I remember, in the mid-80’s, when I was first learning, someone told me, “You know, there is only one mental illness, and there is only one cure. The illness is dysfunctional, insecure thinking taken seriously over time; the cure is seeing that we are the thinkers and we can change.” That moment crystallized everything for me. But back then, I was an entrepreneur, not a mental health professional, and my mind immediately went to my clients. It made sense there, too. Then I started thinking about community, about education — all the same. One problem, one solution. Yet, we could never seem to get people to stop asking what clients, what situations, does “this” work best with! In a world full of specialists, it isn’t easy to make a living as a generalist. But that was always our hope: To question, and ultimately change, the assumptions of the world about the fundamental source of change: the fact that all experience is created from the inside-out. We are the thinkers, constantly using the power to think to create moment-to-moment reality.

The simple answer emerged from the visionary thinking of the people who put together One Solution: Talk about the world from the get-go. Don’t let anyone start thinking too soon about specific applications. Let the applications flow out of the vision for the whole globe.

For years, people have looked upon my resume with suspicion because I have worked with health care, with stressed business executives, with dysfunctional organizations, with youth, with abused women, with individual mental health clients, with educational institutions, with students, with teachers, with non-profits. “What do you exactly do?” people ask. “How could you be working in so many settings?” I used to find it amusing that if I were an accountant, no one would ask those questions. There are, of course, general principles of accounting, which are generally understood. But because I was an Innate Health Consultant, it was confusing.

I would answer, “I work with human beings to help them understand their thinking for what it is, and see how to access their own wisdom.” Very often, that was deemed an insufficient answer. Because we are trained to solve problems from the outside-in — i.e., to identify the problem, find an external source for the problem, come up with a strategy to fix THAT problem — it is hard for people to wrap their minds around the idea that misused and misunderstood thinking is always the essential source of problems. And when people see what thinking really is, how we can change, and how we can access creativity and higher levels of thinking, they can find solutions to everything that appears to be a problem.

After more than 30 years in my work, I am not foolish enough to think that one conference, one weekend, one newly empowered group of people, will bring about immediate change. But it feels like we have seen how to turn the ship in the channel and head to open waters.

For this subtle shift in how we see and present our own work, I offer my heartfelt thanks to the One Solution organizers: #Mara Gleason, #Aaron Turner, #Erik Grunde Olsen, #George Pransky, #Linda Pransky. They stepped up and took a big risk in boldly offering a “One Solution”
global conference because they believe so strongly that the only hope for change is getting the attention of the world in a new way. I am sure they do not think of their efforts as heroic, but I do, because the definition of commitment, in my book, is always fearlessly following your vision.

I’m sure this is only the first of many such conferences, involving many more people, across the world, and I couldn’t be more excited to step up and be a part of it. Join in.

Meanwhile, the whole idea of this is worth reflection. I am asking myself: What DO I do? Could I be doing it differently, better, more impactfully? Am I, in the words of Sydney Banks, pouring “new wine into old bottles,” by fitting my work into existing service paradigms?

At this moment, I am basking in the questions. No answers yet, but the one thing I am certain of is that wisdom will show the way. Change is coming.

The post One Problem; One Solution appeared first on Three Principles Living.

One Problem; One Solution

A beautiful thing happened the last weekend in May, thanks to those with the vision to hold the first “One Solution” conference in Oslo, Norway. In one weekend, they elevated onto the world stage the absolute simplicity and power of the answer offered by a true understanding of how the mind works.

Although I could not attend because of a commitment, I watched what I could of the live stream, and, on the very first night, I had an Aha! moment about all of us (“all of us” being the handful of people who started the work of bringing the Three Principles into all walks of life back in the mid-70’s up through the tens of thousands involved in the work globally today.) For all these years, we’ve been compartmentalized, and when we tried to generalize, we were treated as “pollyanna,” or “naive,” or claiming the impossible. We live in a world in which there is currently no vision for the true meaning of underlying Principles that explain all human experience, that define all human beings as operating the same way at the core, regardless of their differences. So we have hundreds of diagnoses and treatments for all kinds of mental illness; many approaches to many different business problems; separate ideas about how to treat a variety of social justice issues; fragmented approaches to addressing dysfunctional institutions and organizations depending on their size, purpose, culture, location, etc. “All of us” knew from the beginning there was one underlying problem and one underlying solution, but because we were coming at our individual work from our own particular professional interests, the overwhelming significance of the fact that we were all addressing the exact same solution to all the problems was invisible to others.

Consider, for example, the difference between the way we think about Psychology and the way we think about Geometry. No matter what language, culture, environment, situation in which a problem is being addressed by geometry, everyone understands geometry precisely the same way. The principles of Geometry apply across the board, whether you are developing an architectural plan, designing a work of art, creating a fabric pattern, imagining a virtual reality, expanding nanotechnology, or building a sand castle. No one argues whether there are unique rules of geometry that apply differently to different situations. You are working with the same set of assumptions and facts to solve infinite problems. It is implicitly understood that the Principles of Geometry are constants; the variables are the infinite situations in which they can be applied.

The One Solution conference brought to the foreground that, with an understanding of the Principles underlying the human experience, it doesn’t matter what the problem is, the solution is the same, and there is one solution to all of humanity’s problems. Put another way, humanity created the problems; humanity contains the solution to all of them. It took the 30,000-foot view; from there, you lose the details and you can see the outlines.

It absolutely does not matter what problem is being addressed; the solution is one very simple thing: recognize the operating Principles behind all human thinking and experience.

I remember, in the mid-80’s, when I was first learning, someone told me, “You know, there is only one mental illness, and there is only one cure. The illness is dysfunctional, insecure thinking taken seriously over time; the cure is seeing that we are the thinkers and we can change.” That moment crystallized everything for me. But back then, I was an entrepreneur, not a mental health professional, and my mind immediately went to my clients. It made sense there, too. Then I started thinking about community, about education — all the same. One problem, one solution. Yet, we could never seem to get people to stop asking what clients, what situations, does “this” work best with! In a world full of specialists, it isn’t easy to make a living as a generalist. But that was always our hope: To question, and ultimately change, the assumptions of the world about the fundamental source of change: the fact that all experience is created from the inside-out. We are the thinkers, constantly using the power to think to create moment-to-moment reality.

The simple answer emerged from the visionary thinking of the people who put together One Solution: Talk about the world from the get-go. Don’t let anyone start thinking too soon about specific applications. Let the applications flow out of the vision for the whole globe.

For years, people have looked upon my resume with suspicion because I have worked with health care, with stressed business executives, with dysfunctional organizations, with youth, with abused women, with individual mental health clients, with educational institutions, with students, with teachers, with non-profits. “What do you exactly do?” people ask. “How could you be working in so many settings?” I used to find it amusing that if I were an accountant, no one would ask those questions. There are, of course, general principles of accounting, which are generally understood. But because I was an Innate Health Consultant, it was confusing.

I would answer, “I work with human beings to help them understand their thinking for what it is, and see how to access their own wisdom.” Very often, that was deemed an insufficient answer. Because we are trained to solve problems from the outside-in — i.e., to identify the problem, find an external source for the problem, come up with a strategy to fix THAT problem — it is hard for people to wrap their minds around the idea that misused and misunderstood thinking is always the essential source of problems. And when people see what thinking really is, how we can change, and how we can access creativity and higher levels of thinking, they can find solutions to everything that appears to be a problem.

After more than 30 years in my work, I am not foolish enough to think that one conference, one weekend, one newly empowered group of people, will bring about immediate change. But it feels like we have seen how to turn the ship in the channel and head to open waters.

For this subtle shift in how we see and present our own work, I offer my heartfelt thanks to the One Solution organizers: #Mara Gleason, #Aaron Turner, #Erik Grunde Olsen, #George Pransky, #Linda Pransky. They stepped up and took a big risk in boldly offering a “One Solution”
global conference because they believe so strongly that the only hope for change is getting the attention of the world in a new way. I am sure they do not think of their efforts as heroic, but I do, because the definition of commitment, in my book, is always fearlessly following your vision.

I’m sure this is only the first of many such conferences, involving many more people, across the world, and I couldn’t be more excited to step up and be a part of it. Join in.

Meanwhile, the whole idea of this is worth reflection. I am asking myself: What DO I do? Could I be doing it differently, better, more impactfully? Am I, in the words of Sydney Banks, pouring “new wine into old bottles,” by fitting my work into existing service paradigms?

At this moment, I am basking in the questions. No answers yet, but the one thing I am certain of is that wisdom will show the way. Change is coming.

The post One Problem; One Solution appeared first on Three Principles Living.

One Problem; One Solution

global change

A beautiful thing happened the last weekend in May, thanks to those with the vision to hold the first “One Solution” conference in Oslo, Norway. In one weekend, they elevated onto the world stage the absolute simplicity and power of the answer offered by a true understanding of how the mind works.

Although I could not attend because of a commitment, I watched what I could of the live stream, and, on the very first night, I had an Aha! moment about all of us (“all of us” being the handful of people who started the work of bringing the Three Principles into all walks of life back in the mid-70’s up through the tens of thousands involved in the work globally today.) For all these years, we’ve been compartmentalized, and when we tried to generalize, we were treated as “pollyanna,” or “naive,” or claiming the impossible. We live in a world in which there is currently no vision for the true meaning of underlying Principles that explain all human experience, that define all human beings as operating the same way at the core, regardless of their differences. So we have hundreds of diagnoses and treatments for all kinds of mental illness; many approaches to many different business problems; separate ideas about how to treat a variety of social justice issues; fragmented approaches to addressing dysfunctional institutions and organizations depending on their size, purpose, culture, location, etc. “All of us” knew from the beginning there was one underlying problem and one underlying solution, but because we were coming at our individual work from our own particular professional interests, the overwhelming significance of the fact that we were all addressing the exact same solution to all the problems was invisible to others.

Consider, for example, the difference between the way we think about Psychology and the way we think about Geometry. No matter what language, culture, environment, situation in which a problem is being addressed by geometry, everyone understands geometry precisely the same way. The principles of Geometry apply across the board, whether you are developing an architectural plan, designing a work of art, creating a fabric pattern, imagining a virtual reality, expanding nanotechnology, or building a sand castle. No one argues whether there are unique rules of geometry that apply differently to different situations. You are working with the same set of assumptions and facts to solve infinite problems. It is implicitly understood that the Principles of Geometry are constants; the variables are the infinite situations in which they can be applied.

The One Solution conference brought to the foreground that, with an understanding of the Principles underlying the human experience, it doesn’t matter what the problem is, the solution is the same, and there is one solution to all of humanity’s problems. Put another way, humanity created the problems; humanity contains the solution to all of them. It took the 30,000-foot view; from there, you lose the details and you can see the outlines.

It absolutely does not matter what problem is being addressed; the solution is one very simple thing: recognize the operating Principles behind all human thinking and experience.

I remember, in the mid-80’s, when I was first learning, someone told me, “You know, there is only one mental illness, and there is only one cure. The illness is dysfunctional, insecure thinking taken seriously over time; the cure is seeing that we are the thinkers and we can change.” That moment crystallized everything for me. But back then, I was an entrepreneur, not a mental health professional, and my mind immediately went to my clients. It made sense there, too. Then I started thinking about community, about education — all the same. One problem, one solution. Yet, we could never seem to get people to stop asking what clients, what situations, does “this” work best with! In a world full of specialists, it isn’t easy to make a living as a generalist. But that was always our hope: To question, and ultimately change, the assumptions of the world about the fundamental source of change: the fact that all experience is created from the inside-out. We are the thinkers, constantly using the power to think to create moment-to-moment reality.

The simple answer emerged from the visionary thinking of the people who put together One Solution: Talk about the world from the get-go. Don’t let anyone start thinking too soon about specific applications. Let the applications flow out of the vision for the whole globe.

For years, people have looked upon my resume with suspicion because I have worked with health care, with stressed business executives, with dysfunctional organizations, with youth, with abused women, with individual mental health clients, with educational institutions, with students, with teachers, with non-profits. “What do you exactly do?” people ask. “How could you be working in so many settings?” I used to find it amusing that if I were an accountant, no one would ask those questions. There are, of course, general principles of accounting, which are generally understood. But because I was an Innate Health Consultant, it was confusing.

I would answer, “I work with human beings to help them understand their thinking for what it is, and see how to access their own wisdom.” Very often, that was deemed an insufficient answer. Because we are trained to solve problems from the outside-in — i.e., to identify the problem, find an external source for the problem, come up with a strategy to fix THAT problem — it is hard for people to wrap their minds around the idea that misused and misunderstood thinking is always the essential source of problems. And when people see what thinking really is, how we can change, and how we can access creativity and higher levels of thinking, they can find solutions to everything that appears to be a problem.

After more than 30 years in my work, I am not foolish enough to think that one conference, one weekend, one newly empowered group of people, will bring about immediate change. But it feels like we have seen how to turn the ship in the channel and head to open waters.

For this subtle shift in how we see and present our own work, I offer my heartfelt thanks to the One Solution organizers: #Mara Gleason, #Aaron Turner, #Erik Grunde Olsen, #George Pransky, #Linda Pransky. They stepped up and took a big risk in boldly offering a “One Solution”
global conference because they believe so strongly that the only hope for change is getting the attention of the world in a new way. I am sure they do not think of their efforts as heroic, but I do, because the definition of commitment, in my book, is always fearlessly following your vision.

I’m sure this is only the first of many such conferences, involving many more people, across the world, and I couldn’t be more excited to step up and be a part of it. Join in.

Meanwhile, the whole idea of this is worth reflection. I am asking myself: What DO I do? Could I be doing it differently, better, more impactfully? Am I, in the words of Sydney Banks, pouring “new wine into old bottles,” by fitting my work into existing service paradigms?

At this moment, I am basking in the questions. No answers yet, but the one thing I am certain of is that wisdom will show the way. Change is coming.

The post One Problem; One Solution appeared first on Three Principles Living.

Right and Wrong: Painful Thoughts

Many of my clients are intensely engaged in a fruitless, frustrating effort to prove others wrong, or to get others to say or do what they expect. They come in angry and resentful because these people are “ruining” their life or “making” them miserable. They hang their happiness on getting what they think they “need” from people they who have “let them down”.

When”, I always ask them, “is the last time you complied with an angry, accusatory person who insisted that you do or say something?”

The usual response is, “Huh?” That is usually followed, “But you don’t understand. I’m right.”

Of course, in the state of mind we happen to be in, we all think we’re right. And, there’s the rub. Unless we know that “right” is our own thought, we are doomed to righteous indignation and seeking the company only of people who agree with us while demanding satisfaction from those who don’t.

Here’s an example. I was talking to someone who had gotten through a bitter divorce and arrived, painfully, at a shared custody agreement with her ex-husband regarding their young teenager. He started giving the teenager a tremendous amount of freedom, lots of money, and every material thing the teenager asked for. She was attempting to set boundaries, limit spending money and encourage her teenager to work for things that felt important. It wasn’t long before the teenager was playing one off against the other, and manifesting a lot of negative behaviors. So the mother demanded that the whole family go to counseling.

After one session, the counselor told her, “Well, of course, you’re right, but he’s not going to do anything you ask him to do. He feels if he supported your parenting style and helped you, it would be doing something for you, and he doesn’t want to do anything for you. He can’t stand you. So I think you have to work with things as they are, or maybe try to renegotiate your custody agreement.” The woman was devastated. She wanted an answer about how to create change, not a suggestion that she needed to get resigned to an untenable stand-off.

Right now, we live in a world that does not recognize that all people have the capacity to see their thinking for what it is and change their minds. We live in a world where resignation or argument is as good as it gets. We live in a world that assumes each person’s thinking is the way it is and nothing will change. We live in a world that gives all the power to situations, and no power whatsoever to the thinkers of the thoughts that created the situations in the first place.

In the resilient, dynamic, inside-out world represented by the Principles of Mind, Consciousness and Thought, that makes no sense at all. When our clients tell us that someone or something else is making them miserable or doing them wrong, we do not focus on “fixing” the situation or reinforcing their negative view. We focus on the only true source of power, the creative force of each person’s ability to think and think again, and see things for themselves, and appreciate their own unlimited power to change.

All of these situations we address are microcosms of the general failure to solve big problems in the world. People feel victimized by “intractable” situations, rather than seeing that their thinking about the situations is what is holding them in place.

Is it possible that a resentful ex-husband could come to understand that his negative thinking about the past is the source of his hateful feelings about his ex-wife, and question the wisdom of acting against his child’s best interest? Is it possible that an insecure ex-wife could see how her thinking, as well as his, played into the nastiness of the divorce, and question whether her own insecurity was preventing her from finding common ground about what is best for their child? Is it possible that a mental health educator who understood that thinking is a power we all can understand how to use could help resolve this situation?

Yes, Yes, and Yes.

Wake up, world! Wake up to the universal wisdom that could set us all free to resolve conflicts (large and small), create solutions (at home and in the world), and live at peace. It is one thought away from every person on the planet.

To find that thought — whatever healing insight is needed for the situation(s) we are in — all we need is a moment of truth, a moment in which we see for ourselves that we are creating our reality, and we can change it, a moment of quietude into which wisdom flows.

Here is a little talk I offered in 2013 about finding peace on earth, my vision for the 21st Century:

 

 

The post Right and Wrong: Painful Thoughts appeared first on Three Principles Living.

Right and Wrong: Painful Thoughts

Many of my clients are intensely engaged in a fruitless, frustrating effort to prove others wrong, or to get others to say or do what they expect. They come in angry and resentful because these people are “ruining” their life or “making” them miserable. They hang their happiness on getting what they think they “need” from people they who have “let them down”.

When”, I always ask them, “is the last time you complied with an angry, accusatory person who insisted that you do or say something?”

The usual response is, “Huh?” That is usually followed, “But you don’t understand. I’m right.”

Of course, in the state of mind we happen to be in, we all think we’re right. And, there’s the rub. Unless we know that “right” is our own thought, we are doomed to righteous indignation and seeking the company only of people who agree with us while demanding satisfaction from those who don’t.

Here’s an example. I was talking to someone who had gotten through a bitter divorce and arrived, painfully, at a shared custody agreement with her ex-husband regarding their young teenager. He started giving the teenager a tremendous amount of freedom, lots of money, and every material thing the teenager asked for. She was attempting to set boundaries, limit spending money and encourage her teenager to work for things that felt important. It wasn’t long before the teenager was playing one off against the other, and manifesting a lot of negative behaviors. So the mother demanded that the whole family go to counseling.

After one session, the counselor told her, “Well, of course, you’re right, but he’s not going to do anything you ask him to do. He feels if he supported your parenting style and helped you, it would be doing something for you, and he doesn’t want to do anything for you. He can’t stand you. So I think you have to work with things as they are, or maybe try to renegotiate your custody agreement.” The woman was devastated. She wanted an answer about how to create change, not a suggestion that she needed to get resigned to an untenable stand-off.

Right now, we live in a world that does not recognize that all people have the capacity to see their thinking for what it is and change their minds. We live in a world where resignation or argument is as good as it gets. We live in a world that assumes each person’s thinking is the way it is and nothing will change. We live in a world that gives all the power to situations, and no power whatsoever to the thinkers of the thoughts that created the situations in the first place.

In the resilient, dynamic, inside-out world represented by the Principles of Mind, Consciousness and Thought, that makes no sense at all. When our clients tell us that someone or something else is making them miserable or doing them wrong, we do not focus on “fixing” the situation or reinforcing their negative view. We focus on the only true source of power, the creative force of each person’s ability to think and think again, and see things for themselves, and appreciate their own unlimited power to change.

All of these situations we address are microcosms of the general failure to solve big problems in the world. People feel victimized by “intractable” situations, rather than seeing that their thinking about the situations is what is holding them in place.

Is it possible that a resentful ex-husband could come to understand that his negative thinking about the past is the source of his hateful feelings about his ex-wife, and question the wisdom of acting against his child’s best interest? Is it possible that an insecure ex-wife could see how her thinking, as well as his, played into the nastiness of the divorce, and question whether her own insecurity was preventing her from finding common ground about what is best for their child? Is it possible that a mental health educator who understood that thinking is a power we all can understand how to use could help resolve this situation?

Yes, Yes, and Yes.

Wake up, world! Wake up to the universal wisdom that could set us all free to resolve conflicts (large and small), create solutions (at home and in the world), and live at peace. It is one thought away from every person on the planet.

To find that thought — whatever healing insight is needed for the situation(s) we are in — all we need is a moment of truth, a moment in which we see for ourselves that we are creating our reality, and we can change it, a moment of quietude into which wisdom flows.

Here is a little talk I offered in 2013 about finding peace on earth, my vision for the 21st Century:

 

 

The post Right and Wrong: Painful Thoughts appeared first on Three Principles Living.

Right and Wrong: Painful Thoughts

Many of my clients are intensely engaged in a fruitless, frustrating effort to prove others wrong, or to get others to say or do what they expect. They come in angry and resentful because these people are “ruining” their life or “making” them miserable. They hang their happiness on getting what they think they “need” from people they who have “let them down”.

When”, I always ask them, “is the last time you complied with an angry, accusatory person who insisted that you do or say something?”

The usual response is, “Huh?” That is usually followed, “But you don’t understand. I’m right.”

Of course, in the state of mind we happen to be in, we all think we’re right. And, there’s the rub. Unless we know that “right” is our own thought, we are doomed to righteous indignation and seeking the company only of people who agree with us while demanding satisfaction from those who don’t.

Here’s an example. I was talking to someone who had gotten through a bitter divorce and arrived, painfully, at a shared custody agreement with her ex-husband regarding their young teenager. He started giving the teenager a tremendous amount of freedom, lots of money, and every material thing the teenager asked for. She was attempting to set boundaries, limit spending money and encourage her teenager to work for things that felt important. It wasn’t long before the teenager was playing one off against the other, and manifesting a lot of negative behaviors. So the mother demanded that the whole family go to counseling.

After one session, the counselor told her, “Well, of course, you’re right, but he’s not going to do anything you ask him to do. He feels if he supported your parenting style and helped you, it would be doing something for you, and he doesn’t want to do anything for you. He can’t stand you. So I think you have to work with things as they are, or maybe try to renegotiate your custody agreement.” The woman was devastated. She wanted an answer about how to create change, not a suggestion that she needed to get resigned to an untenable stand-off.

Right now, we live in a world that does not recognize that all people have the capacity to see their thinking for what it is and change their minds. We live in a world where resignation or argument is as good as it gets. We live in a world that assumes each person’s thinking is the way it is and nothing will change. We live in a world that gives all the power to situations, and no power whatsoever to the thinkers of the thoughts that created the situations in the first place.

In the resilient, dynamic, inside-out world represented by the Principles of Mind, Consciousness and Thought,Our life is what our thoughts make it - inspirational word by Marcus Aurelius on a slate blackboard with a white chalk and a stack of books against rustic wooden table that makes no sense at all. When our clients tell us that someone or something else is making them miserable or doing them wrong, we do not focus on “fixing” the situation or reinforcing their negative view. We focus on the only true source of power, the creative force of each person’s ability to think and think again, and see things for themselves, and appreciate their own unlimited power to change.

All of these situations we address are microcosms of the general failure to solve big problems in the world. People feel victimized by “intractable” situations, rather than seeing that their thinking about the situations is what is holding them in place.

Is it possible that a resentful ex-husband could come to understand that his negative thinking about the past is the source of his hateful feelings about his ex-wife, and question the wisdom of acting against his child’s best interest? Is it possible that an insecure ex-wife could see how her thinking, as well as his, played into the nastiness of the divorce, and question whether her own insecurity was preventing her from finding common ground about what is best for their child? Is it possible that a mental health educator who understood that thinking is a power we all can understand how to use could help resolve this situation?

Yes, Yes, and Yes.

Wake up, world! Wake up to the universal wisdom that could set us all free to resolve conflicts (large and small), create solutions (at home and in the world), and live at peace. It is one thought away from every person on the planet.

To find that thought — whatever healing insight is needed for the situation(s) we are in — all we need is a moment of truth, a moment in which we see for ourselves that we are creating our reality, and we can change it, a moment of quietude into which wisdom flows.

Here is a little talk I offered in 2013 about finding peace on earth, my vision for the 21st Century:

 

 

The post Right and Wrong: Painful Thoughts appeared first on Three Principles Living.

Living a Dream

We are always living a dream. We cannot experience anything without thinking it first. Whatever thoughts we bring to mind create our experience, which lasts only as long as they are brought to mind. Our thoughts are uniquely our own; no two thinkers arrive at precisely the same thoughts, although many people can share a predilection for certain kinds of thoughts. So each life, truly, is a particular dream, experienced as it unfolds through each person’s thinking.

One of the first statements I saw from Sydney Banks is: “Life is a divine dream, suspended between time, space and matter.” I was fascinated by it, though I could not work out what it must mean at the time. It hung there in my imagination for a few years, equally puzzling to me each time I revisited it. Then I heard Syd speaking once about a conversation he had had with a scientist, in which Syd tried to point out that the constructs of time, space and matter are ideas we’ve made up to be able to talk about our universe. But the only truth is formless energy.  Peering through the thicket of already formed thoughts at formless energy is a pointless exercise. We are bound to be caught in the tangle of our thoughts, not seeing beyond them, if we try to work through them to clear a gateway to infinity.

That gave me the courage to ask Syd a question: “How can I understand that life is a divine dream, suspended between time, space and matter, if I cannot think about it?” At the time I asked that question, the only book Syd had published was Second Chance, in which there is considerable conversation about  SEEING (as opposed to seeing) and KNOWING (as opposed to knowing). The wise character in that book describes SEEING in these two passages, for example (although I highly recommend reading the entire book):

“Remember, I told you …. that there are more realities than meet the eye. This SEEING must come from an experience of SEEING another reality.” (p. 16)

“‘SEEING’ is what evolves man’s mind to a higher level of consciousness. It is this evolvement that enables him to psychologically understand himself and the world around him.” (p.26)

Syd did not answer my question directly, but instead asked me what I thought about Second Chance. I told him I was confused by it and did not know what it all meant. “Good,” he said, “it’s good to be able to admit you don’t know. That’s the opportunity for knowing. From a state of not knowing you are likely to SEE something new.”

So I remained baffled, but I dropped the whole idea of figuring it out. I found that acknowledging not knowing and being at peace with it had really quieted my mind down. Needing to know the answers all the time (a habit developed in elementary school where there was a high premium on being the first with your hand up) had been revving up my thinking a lot more than I had realized. From a quieter state of mind, I was able to glimpse that “SEEING” is spiritual and “seeing” is temporal: that is, SEEING is an experience beyond cognitive limits. SEEING is fluttering briefly into the emptiness before thought where you KNOW the power of thoughts forming, your own power to form thought, as a spiritual gift before form.  I realized that I had previously memorized, pondered about, and repeated the definitions of the Principles as they were always described, thus innocently focusing on the formed word to understand them, rather than awakening to the formless, the true Principles, the spiritual energy of all life in creation, before the words. I had been reading the notes, but missing the music.

That was one of the most exciting insights of my life, and it was a point of transformation. Oh, like all of us, I still talked about the logic of the Principles and described the inside-out outcomes of the ways we create and hold our thinking, but I knew that was all an interpretation of the point, not the point. Not the point. The point is beyond words, in Universal energy we all share and through which we become our formed selves. Seeing the pure energy at the source, though, we have certainty that anything we see or know now could change, simply with the formation of new thought. Access to that reality is through stillness, through quietude, not thinking harder.

Although we can talk about Thought and thoughts, we are pointing to the feeling of the power that frees us from any one thought to release the potential of infinite new thoughts. It doesn’t really matter what anyone thinks, how long they think it, or what they make of it, if they KNOW the Principles. That power is realized and experienced, not taught or learned. For me, in the instant I caught a glimpse of that, I SAW and KNEW the absolute absurdity of taking any thought seriously. No matter what. It’s no more possible to hang onto really beautiful thoughts than to drive away really ugly thoughts. They all pass naturally as the flow of formless energy continues to power us through life. We have to re-think them to “keep” them. When we SEE that for ourselves, we cannot possibly harm ourselves with our own thinking, any thinking. Because we KNOW we are living a dream brought to us by our unique imagination and the creative power of life. We know the dream is fleeting, evanescent, just images we create, passing across the screen of our minds, signifying nothing but the beautiful power to keep creating them.

For me, the depth of gratitude I feel for Sydney Banks for so simply expressing the possibility that any one of us, all of us, can SEE this for ourselves, is immeasurable.

 

The post Living a Dream appeared first on Three Principles Living.

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