Unconditional Love…

Unconditional Love…

When I first got involved in Innate Health, I heard a lot about unconditional love being the answer, no matter what the problem might be. Back then, it sounded nice, but meaningless, to me. I was stepping into this new world from a life that was totally transactional, a life of “If…then”. If I got this contract, then I could give my employees a Christmas bonus; if my daughter got straight A’s, then we would take her to DisneyWorld; if I lost five pounds, then I could wear the red dress to the party… Everything was conditional, including love. Both my husband and I would say things to each other that started with, “If you really loved me, you would…”

Now, 30-some years later, it is so vividly true to me that unconditional love is the answer to everything that it brings tears to my eyes just to think about it. Unconditional love has nothing to do with human transactions. Unconditional love arises in the spirit. It is the pure, uninhibited joy of being alive and integral to the universe.

Conditionality is a human transaction, a product of thought that imposes ideas on how things should be. We make and believe in our own assumptions without any understanding that they are our fabrications. We do not embrace the unpredictable variability of life or of everyone and everything in it. Anything we find acceptable must conform to our opinions and expectations. We reject people and things that don’t fit our ideas or do not make sense within our world view.

Unconditionality is the inchoate vitality before formed thought. It presents no judgment about life or anything in it. We surrender to the flow of it. Without expectations or judgments, we are immersed in being. Unpredictability, variability do not look disorderly or strange as life unfolds moment-to-moment. It just is. We just are. Everything is rich, fascinating, and materializing in the moment.

Unconditionality is profound love of life, of the beautiful energy surging through the universe and through us, and of the wonder of being united with the essential formless force, and yet creating our own passage within it. Unconditional love is the fullness of heart that emerges from pure appreciation of all of it — the darkness and the light, the perfect and the imperfect, the same and the different, the known and the unknown. Unconditional love is deep, soothing peace. In the “isness” of the universe,  there is nothing and no one to fear. We are safe in each present moment in the emerging wisdom that is always available to us. Wisdom is the knowledge that binds the universe together through the creative dynamic of being.

Why is the state of unconditional love the answer, no matter the problem?

The simple fact is that a person who is living with a free and clear mind in that unconditional feeling of gratitude and reverence for life does not bring to mind thoughts of harming or being harmed. No selfish, greedy thoughts. No mean, hurtful thoughts. No disappointed, discouraged thoughts. No resentful, vengeful thoughts. No anxious, fearful thoughts. That state of mind, that state of being, brings with it access to the flow of wisdom and confidence, moment-to-moment, that we can count on to guide us through life’s ups and downs. Wisdom propels us forward. Entertaining negative or dysfunctional or destructive thinking feels wrong and unpleasant if it enters the mind.  Those who understand the nature of thought turn away from such ideas — just allow them to pass without action — and look to quiet their thinking and embrace wisdom once more.

Is it unrealistic or even wildly pollyanna to imagine that such a state could come to dominate the experience of humanity? That is an unanswered question. Until we turn our backs on the belief that the content of our personal thinking is more important than our understanding of the true spiritual being through which we are generating that thinking, we will not know the answer. Beliefs seem powerful. They look very real to us while they are on our minds, especially when we don’t know how they got there. As more and more people come to recognize themselves as the agents of life, rather than seeing circumstances as the agency of their life, the ease with which humanity can find personal peace of mind and act from wisdom increases. When wisdom informs more and more of human choices, we will live in a different world, grounded in peace and hope, filled with unconditional love.

Once unconditional love is illuminated as the quintessential power to live, then who would not want to call it home? Who would willingly turn away from natural peace and joy?

 

European Tour – Monday and an inspiring day at the conference

May 22. Monday.

Realizing that I had not taken advantage of walking around these beautiful grounds at the Grove, I decided to go out first thing in the morning with my camera and take a walk. I loved it. It was chilly but very peaceful.

I came back in time for breakfast, and caught Bill and Linda Pettit again. Only ate healthy this time, with some strange wet muesli, fruit and yogurt, despite the temptations of bacon and eggs and multi-choices of sausages. Then it was time to pile into the vans to the conference.

I found the speakers today to be much more inspiring. Chip Chipman in particular was so deeply spiritual; the feeling that he communicated was truly beautiful. And George Pransky closed the day with another inspiring talk on levels of consciousness, even though he didn’t call it that.

I was also inspired by three different things concerning the presentation I did on research with Linda Ramus and Elizabeth Lovius.

First I was inspired by my own work, because of what I uncovered by going through the research Tom Kelley and I did with a much closer look. I discovered that with every single mental health variable and well-being variable across two different studies, “innate health via a clear mind” showed up to be a more significant factor then thought recognition, sometimes much more, with one exception being Social Well-Being. That is incredible information for us Three Principles teachers. The fact is, it’s easier to teach Thought Recognition, so most 3P people do it, and it is less easy to teach innate health/our true nature/pure consciousness/its connection to the oneness of all things, so fewer practitioners do it, yet it has been found to be more powerful.

But the other thing that totally inspired me is that Elizabeth is putting together online website that will have all Three Principles resources and research studies listed in it in a very user-friendly way. I’m telling you, I was totally inspired by what she is doing.

The third thing that totally inspired me is a couple of people in the audience during the research breakout–I can only remember Karen McGrath’s name, and I hope I got that right–showed me data from a study they are conducting on the relationship between 3P understanding and various health related issues, and even though they use only a small sample size,  9 out of 11 people showed physical health improvements, sometimes very dramatic changes. Very inspiring. I’m going to see what I can do to have Tom Kelley and I work with them to bring this preliminary data to a peer-reviewed journal. The feeling at the conference today really picked up and became very beautiful.

Then I had dinner with Chip and Jan and Cathy Casey, none of whom I’ve had that much of a chance to hang out with before, and it was really very nice. Except we had now left the Grove hotel and even the Hilton in which we were put felt like a real comedown after the Grove. Any hotel would be.

The post European Tour – Monday and an inspiring day at the conference appeared first on Center for Inside-Out Understanding.

One Problem; One Solution

global change

A beautiful thing happened the last weekend in May, thanks to those with the vision to hold the first “One Solution” conference in Oslo, Norway. In one weekend, they elevated onto the world stage the absolute simplicity and power of the answer offered by a true understanding of how the mind works.

Although I could not attend because of a commitment, I watched what I could of the live stream, and, on the very first night, I had an Aha! moment about all of us (“all of us” being the handful of people who started the work of bringing the Three Principles into all walks of life back in the mid-70’s up through the tens of thousands involved in the work globally today.) For all these years, we’ve been compartmentalized, and when we tried to generalize, we were treated as “pollyanna,” or “naive,” or claiming the impossible. We live in a world in which there is currently no vision for the true meaning of underlying Principles that explain all human experience, that define all human beings as operating the same way at the core, regardless of their differences. So we have hundreds of diagnoses and treatments for all kinds of mental illness; many approaches to many different business problems; separate ideas about how to treat a variety of social justice issues; fragmented approaches to addressing dysfunctional institutions and organizations depending on their size, purpose, culture, location, etc. “All of us” knew from the beginning there was one underlying problem and one underlying solution, but because we were coming at our individual work from our own particular professional interests, the overwhelming significance of the fact that we were all addressing the exact same solution to all the problems was invisible to others.

Consider, for example, the difference between the way we think about Psychology and the way we think about Geometry. No matter what language, culture, environment, situation in which a problem is being addressed by geometry, everyone understands geometry precisely the same way. The principles of Geometry apply across the board, whether you are developing an architectural plan, designing a work of art, creating a fabric pattern, imagining a virtual reality, expanding nanotechnology, or building a sand castle. No one argues whether there are unique rules of geometry that apply differently to different situations. You are working with the same set of assumptions and facts to solve infinite problems. It is implicitly understood that the Principles of Geometry are constants; the variables are the infinite situations in which they can be applied.

The One Solution conference brought to the foreground that, with an understanding of the Principles underlying the human experience, it doesn’t matter what the problem is, the solution is the same, and there is one solution to all of humanity’s problems. Put another way, humanity created the problems; humanity contains the solution to all of them. It took the 30,000-foot view; from there, you lose the details and you can see the outlines.

It absolutely does not matter what problem is being addressed; the solution is one very simple thing: recognize the operating Principles behind all human thinking and experience.

I remember, in the mid-80’s, when I was first learning, someone told me, “You know, there is only one mental illness, and there is only one cure. The illness is dysfunctional, insecure thinking taken seriously over time; the cure is seeing that we are the thinkers and we can change.” That moment crystallized everything for me. But back then, I was an entrepreneur, not a mental health professional, and my mind immediately went to my clients. It made sense there, too. Then I started thinking about community, about education — all the same. One problem, one solution. Yet, we could never seem to get people to stop asking what clients, what situations, does “this” work best with! In a world full of specialists, it isn’t easy to make a living as a generalist. But that was always our hope: To question, and ultimately change, the assumptions of the world about the fundamental source of change: the fact that all experience is created from the inside-out. We are the thinkers, constantly using the power to think to create moment-to-moment reality.

The simple answer emerged from the visionary thinking of the people who put together One Solution: Talk about the world from the get-go. Don’t let anyone start thinking too soon about specific applications. Let the applications flow out of the vision for the whole globe.

For years, people have looked upon my resume with suspicion because I have worked with health care, with stressed business executives, with dysfunctional organizations, with youth, with abused women, with individual mental health clients, with educational institutions, with students, with teachers, with non-profits. “What do you exactly do?” people ask. “How could you be working in so many settings?” I used to find it amusing that if I were an accountant, no one would ask those questions. There are, of course, general principles of accounting, which are generally understood. But because I was an Innate Health Consultant, it was confusing.

I would answer, “I work with human beings to help them understand their thinking for what it is, and see how to access their own wisdom.” Very often, that was deemed an insufficient answer. Because we are trained to solve problems from the outside-in — i.e., to identify the problem, find an external source for the problem, come up with a strategy to fix THAT problem — it is hard for people to wrap their minds around the idea that misused and misunderstood thinking is always the essential source of problems. And when people see what thinking really is, how we can change, and how we can access creativity and higher levels of thinking, they can find solutions to everything that appears to be a problem.

After more than 30 years in my work, I am not foolish enough to think that one conference, one weekend, one newly empowered group of people, will bring about immediate change. But it feels like we have seen how to turn the ship in the channel and head to open waters.

For this subtle shift in how we see and present our own work, I offer my heartfelt thanks to the One Solution organizers: #Mara Gleason, #Aaron Turner, #Erik Grunde Olsen, #George Pransky, #Linda Pransky. They stepped up and took a big risk in boldly offering a “One Solution”
global conference because they believe so strongly that the only hope for change is getting the attention of the world in a new way. I am sure they do not think of their efforts as heroic, but I do, because the definition of commitment, in my book, is always fearlessly following your vision.

I’m sure this is only the first of many such conferences, involving many more people, across the world, and I couldn’t be more excited to step up and be a part of it. Join in.

Meanwhile, the whole idea of this is worth reflection. I am asking myself: What DO I do? Could I be doing it differently, better, more impactfully? Am I, in the words of Sydney Banks, pouring “new wine into old bottles,” by fitting my work into existing service paradigms?

At this moment, I am basking in the questions. No answers yet, but the one thing I am certain of is that wisdom will show the way. Change is coming.

The post One Problem; One Solution appeared first on Three Principles Living.

One Problem; One Solution

A beautiful thing happened the last weekend in May, thanks to those with the vision to hold the first “One Solution” conference in Oslo, Norway. In one weekend, they elevated onto the world stage the absolute simplicity and power of the answer offered by a true understanding of how the mind works.

Although I could not attend because of a commitment, I watched what I could of the live stream, and, on the very first night, I had an Aha! moment about all of us (“all of us” being the handful of people who started the work of bringing the Three Principles into all walks of life back in the mid-70’s up through the tens of thousands involved in the work globally today.) For all these years, we’ve been compartmentalized, and when we tried to generalize, we were treated as “pollyanna,” or “naive,” or claiming the impossible. We live in a world in which there is currently no vision for the true meaning of underlying Principles that explain all human experience, that define all human beings as operating the same way at the core, regardless of their differences. So we have hundreds of diagnoses and treatments for all kinds of mental illness; many approaches to many different business problems; separate ideas about how to treat a variety of social justice issues; fragmented approaches to addressing dysfunctional institutions and organizations depending on their size, purpose, culture, location, etc. “All of us” knew from the beginning there was one underlying problem and one underlying solution, but because we were coming at our individual work from our own particular professional interests, the overwhelming significance of the fact that we were all addressing the exact same solution to all the problems was invisible to others.

Consider, for example, the difference between the way we think about Psychology and the way we think about Geometry. No matter what language, culture, environment, situation in which a problem is being addressed by geometry, everyone understands geometry precisely the same way. The principles of Geometry apply across the board, whether you are developing an architectural plan, designing a work of art, creating a fabric pattern, imagining a virtual reality, expanding nanotechnology, or building a sand castle. No one argues whether there are unique rules of geometry that apply differently to different situations. You are working with the same set of assumptions and facts to solve infinite problems. It is implicitly understood that the Principles of Geometry are constants; the variables are the infinite situations in which they can be applied.

The One Solution conference brought to the foreground that, with an understanding of the Principles underlying the human experience, it doesn’t matter what the problem is, the solution is the same, and there is one solution to all of humanity’s problems. Put another way, humanity created the problems; humanity contains the solution to all of them. It took the 30,000-foot view; from there, you lose the details and you can see the outlines.

It absolutely does not matter what problem is being addressed; the solution is one very simple thing: recognize the operating Principles behind all human thinking and experience.

I remember, in the mid-80’s, when I was first learning, someone told me, “You know, there is only one mental illness, and there is only one cure. The illness is dysfunctional, insecure thinking taken seriously over time; the cure is seeing that we are the thinkers and we can change.” That moment crystallized everything for me. But back then, I was an entrepreneur, not a mental health professional, and my mind immediately went to my clients. It made sense there, too. Then I started thinking about community, about education — all the same. One problem, one solution. Yet, we could never seem to get people to stop asking what clients, what situations, does “this” work best with! In a world full of specialists, it isn’t easy to make a living as a generalist. But that was always our hope: To question, and ultimately change, the assumptions of the world about the fundamental source of change: the fact that all experience is created from the inside-out. We are the thinkers, constantly using the power to think to create moment-to-moment reality.

The simple answer emerged from the visionary thinking of the people who put together One Solution: Talk about the world from the get-go. Don’t let anyone start thinking too soon about specific applications. Let the applications flow out of the vision for the whole globe.

For years, people have looked upon my resume with suspicion because I have worked with health care, with stressed business executives, with dysfunctional organizations, with youth, with abused women, with individual mental health clients, with educational institutions, with students, with teachers, with non-profits. “What do you exactly do?” people ask. “How could you be working in so many settings?” I used to find it amusing that if I were an accountant, no one would ask those questions. There are, of course, general principles of accounting, which are generally understood. But because I was an Innate Health Consultant, it was confusing.

I would answer, “I work with human beings to help them understand their thinking for what it is, and see how to access their own wisdom.” Very often, that was deemed an insufficient answer. Because we are trained to solve problems from the outside-in — i.e., to identify the problem, find an external source for the problem, come up with a strategy to fix THAT problem — it is hard for people to wrap their minds around the idea that misused and misunderstood thinking is always the essential source of problems. And when people see what thinking really is, how we can change, and how we can access creativity and higher levels of thinking, they can find solutions to everything that appears to be a problem.

After more than 30 years in my work, I am not foolish enough to think that one conference, one weekend, one newly empowered group of people, will bring about immediate change. But it feels like we have seen how to turn the ship in the channel and head to open waters.

For this subtle shift in how we see and present our own work, I offer my heartfelt thanks to the One Solution organizers: #Mara Gleason, #Aaron Turner, #Erik Grunde Olsen, #George Pransky, #Linda Pransky. They stepped up and took a big risk in boldly offering a “One Solution”
global conference because they believe so strongly that the only hope for change is getting the attention of the world in a new way. I am sure they do not think of their efforts as heroic, but I do, because the definition of commitment, in my book, is always fearlessly following your vision.

I’m sure this is only the first of many such conferences, involving many more people, across the world, and I couldn’t be more excited to step up and be a part of it. Join in.

Meanwhile, the whole idea of this is worth reflection. I am asking myself: What DO I do? Could I be doing it differently, better, more impactfully? Am I, in the words of Sydney Banks, pouring “new wine into old bottles,” by fitting my work into existing service paradigms?

At this moment, I am basking in the questions. No answers yet, but the one thing I am certain of is that wisdom will show the way. Change is coming.

The post One Problem; One Solution appeared first on Three Principles Living.

One Problem; One Solution

A beautiful thing happened the last weekend in May, thanks to those with the vision to hold the first “One Solution” conference in Oslo, Norway. In one weekend, they elevated onto the world stage the absolute simplicity and power of the answer offered by a true understanding of how the mind works.

Although I could not attend because of a commitment, I watched what I could of the live stream, and, on the very first night, I had an Aha! moment about all of us (“all of us” being the handful of people who started the work of bringing the Three Principles into all walks of life back in the mid-70’s up through the tens of thousands involved in the work globally today.) For all these years, we’ve been compartmentalized, and when we tried to generalize, we were treated as “pollyanna,” or “naive,” or claiming the impossible. We live in a world in which there is currently no vision for the true meaning of underlying Principles that explain all human experience, that define all human beings as operating the same way at the core, regardless of their differences. So we have hundreds of diagnoses and treatments for all kinds of mental illness; many approaches to many different business problems; separate ideas about how to treat a variety of social justice issues; fragmented approaches to addressing dysfunctional institutions and organizations depending on their size, purpose, culture, location, etc. “All of us” knew from the beginning there was one underlying problem and one underlying solution, but because we were coming at our individual work from our own particular professional interests, the overwhelming significance of the fact that we were all addressing the exact same solution to all the problems was invisible to others.

Consider, for example, the difference between the way we think about Psychology and the way we think about Geometry. No matter what language, culture, environment, situation in which a problem is being addressed by geometry, everyone understands geometry precisely the same way. The principles of Geometry apply across the board, whether you are developing an architectural plan, designing a work of art, creating a fabric pattern, imagining a virtual reality, expanding nanotechnology, or building a sand castle. No one argues whether there are unique rules of geometry that apply differently to different situations. You are working with the same set of assumptions and facts to solve infinite problems. It is implicitly understood that the Principles of Geometry are constants; the variables are the infinite situations in which they can be applied.

The One Solution conference brought to the foreground that, with an understanding of the Principles underlying the human experience, it doesn’t matter what the problem is, the solution is the same, and there is one solution to all of humanity’s problems. Put another way, humanity created the problems; humanity contains the solution to all of them. It took the 30,000-foot view; from there, you lose the details and you can see the outlines.

It absolutely does not matter what problem is being addressed; the solution is one very simple thing: recognize the operating Principles behind all human thinking and experience.

I remember, in the mid-80’s, when I was first learning, someone told me, “You know, there is only one mental illness, and there is only one cure. The illness is dysfunctional, insecure thinking taken seriously over time; the cure is seeing that we are the thinkers and we can change.” That moment crystallized everything for me. But back then, I was an entrepreneur, not a mental health professional, and my mind immediately went to my clients. It made sense there, too. Then I started thinking about community, about education — all the same. One problem, one solution. Yet, we could never seem to get people to stop asking what clients, what situations, does “this” work best with! In a world full of specialists, it isn’t easy to make a living as a generalist. But that was always our hope: To question, and ultimately change, the assumptions of the world about the fundamental source of change: the fact that all experience is created from the inside-out. We are the thinkers, constantly using the power to think to create moment-to-moment reality.

The simple answer emerged from the visionary thinking of the people who put together One Solution: Talk about the world from the get-go. Don’t let anyone start thinking too soon about specific applications. Let the applications flow out of the vision for the whole globe.

For years, people have looked upon my resume with suspicion because I have worked with health care, with stressed business executives, with dysfunctional organizations, with youth, with abused women, with individual mental health clients, with educational institutions, with students, with teachers, with non-profits. “What do you exactly do?” people ask. “How could you be working in so many settings?” I used to find it amusing that if I were an accountant, no one would ask those questions. There are, of course, general principles of accounting, which are generally understood. But because I was an Innate Health Consultant, it was confusing.

I would answer, “I work with human beings to help them understand their thinking for what it is, and see how to access their own wisdom.” Very often, that was deemed an insufficient answer. Because we are trained to solve problems from the outside-in — i.e., to identify the problem, find an external source for the problem, come up with a strategy to fix THAT problem — it is hard for people to wrap their minds around the idea that misused and misunderstood thinking is always the essential source of problems. And when people see what thinking really is, how we can change, and how we can access creativity and higher levels of thinking, they can find solutions to everything that appears to be a problem.

After more than 30 years in my work, I am not foolish enough to think that one conference, one weekend, one newly empowered group of people, will bring about immediate change. But it feels like we have seen how to turn the ship in the channel and head to open waters.

For this subtle shift in how we see and present our own work, I offer my heartfelt thanks to the One Solution organizers: #Mara Gleason, #Aaron Turner, #Erik Grunde Olsen, #George Pransky, #Linda Pransky. They stepped up and took a big risk in boldly offering a “One Solution”
global conference because they believe so strongly that the only hope for change is getting the attention of the world in a new way. I am sure they do not think of their efforts as heroic, but I do, because the definition of commitment, in my book, is always fearlessly following your vision.

I’m sure this is only the first of many such conferences, involving many more people, across the world, and I couldn’t be more excited to step up and be a part of it. Join in.

Meanwhile, the whole idea of this is worth reflection. I am asking myself: What DO I do? Could I be doing it differently, better, more impactfully? Am I, in the words of Sydney Banks, pouring “new wine into old bottles,” by fitting my work into existing service paradigms?

At this moment, I am basking in the questions. No answers yet, but the one thing I am certain of is that wisdom will show the way. Change is coming.

The post One Problem; One Solution appeared first on Three Principles Living.

The Joy of Teaching and Learning

At heart, I love teaching more than anything else I’ve ever done. And, at heart, I know the joy of teaching, and the pain of it, too. Teachers today face student attitudes and system restrictions that inhibit their sense of freedom and ease in the classroom. Teachers today, at every level from pre-school to university, are leaving the profession, just to escape the pressures they feel that have nothing to do with what drew them into teaching and learning.

Across a long career that included a lot of other work, I have taught middle school, high school, junior college, undergraduate, graduate and adult education — the whole gamut of teaching experience. At every level, I totally loved watching students flourish and learn, and at every level, I experienced frustration, disappointment, restriction in the system. I know the pain and the joy first-hand.

And I know, too, the most important lesson I have ever learned: The pain and the joy are not coming AT me; they are coming THROUGH me, depending on my understanding of how I hold and use my own power to think about my situation. There is a distinct dividing line in my life: Before 1989, and after 1989. What happened in 1988-89? I realized how the human mind truly works to create our experience of life. Before then, I honestly (like most people) believed that I had nothing to do with what I thought or how I felt about things; I honestly believed that circumstances created my experience of life. I honestly believed that if I was in a negative, difficult situation, of course I would feel terrible, and would have to extricate myself from those circumstances to feel better.

After 1989, I knew, without a doubt, that I was the thinker creating my own thoughts and becoming conscious of what I had created as reality — and that I and I alone was responsible for how I responded to life situations. This gave me a sense of freedom and empowerment that has allowed me, for the rest of my life, to make the best of any and every circumstance I have encountered. What happened in that year? I stumbled into a group of people sharing the logic of a discovery that there are Universal Principles that determine the way we create and experience our own thinking, and that simply recognizing them behind life provides immunity from suffering from our own worst thoughts.

You can believe this or not. Everyone has complete freedom to think whatever they do, and take it more or less seriously. But in my experience, over all these years, once people look to see what feels true to them, the recognition that they are creating their own experience via the power of thought resonates deep within them, and they, too, find freedom and release.

In all the years I have looked to see this more deeply for myself, and share it more effectively with others, I have always had in the back of my mind that the ideal starting point for this to help the most people possible would be schools. In situations I know from all my wonderful colleagues who teach all over the world from this perspective, where young people have recognized that they are creating their own lives from the inside-out with their own power to think, they have bypassed the insecurity and emotional instability that plagues so many in our schools now. They know how to find their own peace of mind, regardless of what others are saying or doing. They self-correct. And, free from insecurity and self-doubt, they truly enjoy learning, and being a part of the school community.

As a teacher myself, I know that from the perspective of understanding how thinking works, I no longer experienced frustration or upset at the system; I found I could access my own insights as to how to work with or around issues and obstacles that had previously seemed insurmountable. I lost my judgments about people and institutions, and saw that everyone was doing the best they could, given how they were holding and using their thinking. I stopped taking things personally, and just felt gratitude and love for my students, my subject, my colleagues, and my opportunities to contribute. I truly enjoyed teaching, without the burden of distractions. Once I started seeing and speaking to the resilience and well-being in my students, my “problem” students disappeared. I found that almost all my students enjoyed learning as much as I enjoyed teaching, and only occasionally, when someone dipped into a state of insecurity, did I have to stop what I was doing to help a struggling student come back into the present moment and calm down.

It may sound pollyanna to some who read this, given the state of many schools today. There are places in the world in which it may sound ho-hum — something that seems routine. The state of education, globally, is highly variable. That variability, however, has more to do with the way people are, their level of peace of mind and respect, than with the resources allocated. There are classrooms in remote parts of the world where even pencil and paper are scarce resources, and books are old and tattered, and schoolrooms are sparse and uncomfortable — and yet the joy is palpable. The gratitude the students feel for learning is profound. The love the teachers feel is deep and non-contingent.

Once we understand our own role in the creation of our experiences of everything we’re doing; once we understand how everyone’s thinking works, and how much control each one of us always has over what we do with our own power to think, everything looks different.

We are excited and happy to offer these courses globally, in hopes that teachers, students and schools everywhere will become the petri dish in which world peace is nurtured and grown through peace of mind in the generations to come.

Here is a brief video introduction to what you can expect from these courses:

The post The Joy of Teaching and Learning appeared first on Three Principles Living.

The Joy of Teaching and Learning

At heart, I love teaching more than anything else I’ve ever done. And, at heart, I know the joy of teaching, and the pain of it, too. Teachers today face student attitudes and system restrictions that inhibit their sense of freedom and ease in the classroom. Teachers today, at every level from pre-school to university, are leaving the profession, just to escape the pressures they feel that have nothing to do with what drew them into teaching and learning.

Across a long career that included a lot of other work, I have taught middle school, high school, junior college, undergraduate, graduate and adult education — the whole gamut of teaching experience. At every level, I totally loved watching students flourish and learn, and at every level, I experienced frustration, disappointment, restriction in the system. I know the pain and the joy first-hand.

And I know, too, the most important lesson I have ever learned: The pain and the joy are not coming AT me; they are coming THROUGH me, depending on my understanding of how I hold and use my own power to think about my situation. There is a distinct dividing line in my life: Before 1989, and after 1989. What happened in 1988-89? I realized how the human mind truly works to create our experience of life. Before then, I honestly (like most people) believed that I had nothing to do with what I thought or how I felt about things; I honestly believed that circumstances created my experience of life. I honestly believed that if I was in a negative, difficult situation, of course I would feel terrible, and would have to extricate myself from those circumstances to feel better.

After 1989, I knew, without a doubt, that I was the thinker creating my own thoughts and becoming conscious of what I had created as reality — and that I and I alone was responsible for how I responded to life situations. This gave me a sense of freedom and empowerment that has allowed me, for the rest of my life, to make the best of any and every circumstance I have encountered. What happened in that year? I stumbled into a group of people sharing the logic of a discovery that there are Universal Principles that determine the way we create and experience our own thinking, and that simply recognizing them behind life provides immunity from suffering from our own worst thoughts.

You can believe this or not. Everyone has complete freedom to think whatever they do, and take it more or less seriously. But in my experience, over all these years, once people look to see what feels true to them, the recognition that they are creating their own experience via the power of thought resonates deep within them, and they, too, find freedom and release.

In all the years I have looked to see this more deeply for myself, and share it more effectively with others, I have always had in the back of my mind that the ideal starting point for this to help the most people possible would be schools. In situations I know from all my wonderful colleagues who teach all over the world from this perspective, where young people have recognized that they are creating their own lives from the inside-out with their own power to think, they have bypassed the insecurity and emotional instability that plagues so many in our schools now. They know how to find their own peace of mind, regardless of what others are saying or doing. They self-correct. And, free from insecurity and self-doubt, they truly enjoy learning, and being a part of the school community.

As a teacher myself, I know that from the perspective of understanding how thinking works, I no longer experienced frustration or upset at the system; I found I could access my own insights as to how to work with or around issues and obstacles that had previously seemed insurmountable. I lost my judgments about people and institutions, and saw that everyone was doing the best they could, given how they were holding and using their thinking. I stopped taking things personally, and just felt gratitude and love for my students, my subject, my colleagues, and my opportunities to contribute. I truly enjoyed teaching, without the burden of distractions. Once I started seeing and speaking to the resilience and well-being in my students, my “problem” students disappeared. I found that almost all my students enjoyed learning as much as I enjoyed teaching, and only occasionally, when someone dipped into a state of insecurity, did I have to stop what I was doing to help a struggling student come back into the present moment and calm down.

It may sound pollyanna to some who read this, given the state of many schools today. There are places in the world in which it may sound ho-hum — something that seems routine. The state of education, globally, is highly variable. That variability, however, has more to do with the way people are, their level of peace of mind and respect, than with the resources allocated. There are classrooms in remote parts of the world where even pencil and paper are scarce resources, and books are old and tattered, and schoolrooms are sparse and uncomfortable — and yet the joy is palpable. The gratitude the students feel for learning is profound. The love the teachers feel is deep and non-contingent.

Once we understand our own role in the creation of our experiences of everything we’re doing; once we understand how everyone’s thinking works, and how much control each one of us always has over what we do with our own power to think, everything looks different.

We are excited and happy to offer these courses globally, in hopes that teachers, students and schools everywhere will become the petri dish in which world peace is nurtured and grown through peace of mind in the generations to come.

Here is a brief video introduction to what you can expect from these courses:

The post The Joy of Teaching and Learning appeared first on Three Principles Living.

The Joy of Teaching and Learning

At heart, I love teaching more than anything else I’ve ever done. And, at heart, I know the joy of teaching, and the pain of it, too. Teachers today face student attitudes and system restrictions that inhibit their sense of freedom and ease in the classroom. Teachers today, at every level from pre-school to university, are leaving the profession, just to escape the pressures they feel that have nothing to do with what drew them into teaching and learning.

Across a long career that included a lot of other work, I have taught middle school, high school, junior college, undergraduate, graduate and adult education — the whole gamut of teaching experience. At every level, I totally loved watching students flourish and learn, and at every level, I experienced frustration, disappointment, restriction in the system. I know the pain and the joy first-hand.

And I know, too, the most important lesson I have ever learned: The pain and the joy are not coming AT me; they are coming THROUGH me, depending on my understanding of how I hold and use my own power to think about my situation. There is a distinct dividing line in my life: Before 1989, and after 1989. What happened in 1988-89? I realized how the human mind truly works to create our experience of life. Before then, I honestly (like most people) believed that I had nothing to do with what I thought or how I felt about things; I honestly believed that circumstances created my experience of life. I honestly believed that if I was in a negative, difficult situation, of course I would feel terrible, and would have to extricate myself from those circumstances to feel better.

After 1989, I knew, without a doubt, that I was the thinker creating my own thoughts and becoming conscious of what I had created as reality — and that I and I alone was responsible for how I responded to life situations. This gave me a sense of freedom and empowerment that has allowed me, for the rest of my life, to make the best of any and every circumstance I have encountered. What happened in that year? I stumbled into a group of people sharing the logic of a discovery that there are Universal Principles that determine the way we create and experience our own thinking, and that simply recognizing them behind life provides immunity from suffering from our own worst thoughts.

You can believe this or not. Everyone has complete freedom to think whatever they do, and take it more or less seriously. But in my experience, over all these years, once people look to see what feels true to them, the recognition that they are creating their own experience via the power of thought resonates deep within them, and they, too, find freedom and release.

In all the years I have looked to see this more deeply for myself, and share it more effectively with others, I have always had in the back of my mind that the ideal starting point for this to help the most people possible would be schools. In situations I know from all my wonderful colleagues who teach all over the world from this perspective, where young people have recognized that they are creating their own lives from the inside-out with their own power to think, they have bypassed the insecurity and emotional instability that plagues so many in our schools now. They know how to find their own peace of mind, regardless of what others are saying or doing. They self-correct. And, free from insecurity and self-doubt, they truly enjoy learning, and being a part of the school community.

As a teacher myself, I know that from the perspective of understanding how thinking works, I no longer experienced frustration or upset at the system; I found I could access my own insights as to how to work with or around issues and obstacles that had previously seemed insurmountable. I lost my judgments about people and institutions, and saw that everyone was doing the best they could, given how they were holding and using their thinking. I stopped taking things personally, and just felt gratitude and love for my students, my subject, my colleagues, and my opportunities to contribute. I truly enjoyed teaching, without the burden of distractions. Once I started seeing and speaking to the resilience and well-being in my students, my “problem” students disappeared. I found that almost all my students enjoyed learning as much as I enjoyed teaching, and only occasionally, when someone dipped into a state of insecurity, did I have to stop what I was doing to help a struggling student come back into the present moment and calm down.

It may sound pollyanna to some who read this, given the state of many schools today. There are places in the world in which it may sound ho-hum — something that seems routine. The state of education, globally, is highly variable. That variability, however, has more to do with the way people are, their level of peace of mind and respect, than with the resources allocated. There are classrooms in remote parts of the world where even pencil and paper are scarce resources, and books are old and tattered, and schoolrooms are sparse and uncomfortable — and yet the joy is palpable. The gratitude the students feel for learning is profound. The love the teachers feel is deep and non-contingent.

Once we understand our own role in the creation of our experiences of everything we’re doing; once we understand how everyone’s thinking works, and how much control each one of us always has over what we do with our own power to think, everything looks different.

We are excited and happy to offer these courses globally, in hopes that teachers, students and schools everywhere will become the petri dish in which world peace is nurtured and grown through peace of mind in the generations to come.

Here is a brief video introduction to what you can expect from these courses:

The post The Joy of Teaching and Learning appeared first on Three Principles Living.

Feeling Our Way through Life

Keyboard close-up with three smiley keys (emoticons)

Keyboard close-up with three smiley keys (emoticons)

People seek help from counselors when they feel bad. No one has ever come into a session with me to complain about their thinking. They come in to say, “I’m really depressed.” “I’m sad and I can’t seem to get over it.” “I am so anxious that I can’t concentrate.” “I get so angry I feel like hitting my children.” That kind of statement.

So, intuitively, we know that bad feelings are a sign that we need help. But we believe the bad feelings are coming from the events, people and circumstances in our life. The expectation people usually start with is that a mentor or counselor will help them to “deal with” their feelings.
They don’t anticipate actually feeling that much better, just coping much better with how bad they feel. They’re usually looking for techniques or strategies, eager to tell me about all the things they’ve already tried that haven’t worked over time. Yoga. Meditation. Art therapy. Long walks. Medication. Massage.

Here’s the thing. If you make a recipe that doesn’t taste good, it’s not going to taste any better if you eat it by candlelight, or eat slowly, or serve bread with it, or use better cutlery, or put flowers on the table. You cooked it. You don’t like it. Smart money says you toss it aside take the recipe out of your recipe file, and stop making it.

Our feelings are the experiences we cook up with the thoughts we bring to mind. If we don’t like them, getting over them is no more of a big deal than scraping a plate into the garbage, avoiding that recipe, and moving on. If you keep cooking up the same combination of stuff, you’’ll keep getting the same unpleasant results. We don’t do that with food. Why do it we do it with ourselves?

For me, it was simply not knowing where my feelings were actually coming from. Until someone pointed it out to me, I never noticed that the same people, events and circumstances did not always produce the same feelings, that I often felt completely differently about things at different times. I had just accepted the prevailing view I grew up with that we were always reacting to life, that life could and would make us feel bad or good.

It was a revelation to me that my thinking had anything to do with it. I rejected the whole idea at first. What? I was making myself miserable? I would never do that on purpose! How dare anyone suggest that? But it very quickly dawned on me that if I had the power to make myself miserable, I had the power to make myself anything. Maybe that was actually good news; I could change even if people, events and circumstances around me did not change. Wow!

The only thing in life we really do have any control over is ourselves. We can’t force other people to change; we can’t prevent life events; we can’t pick the historical or demographic circumstances into which we’re born. But we come fully equipped to make the most of our lives, whatever they are. Again, Wow!

We’ve learned to go over and over our same old thinking, trying to understand ourselves, or figure out why we think this or that, or resolve our past traumas by re-living them, hoping they’ll look different to us. As we do this, we feel worse and worse. In my experience of working with people, though, the hardest part of my work is to get them to stop talking about all the negative thoughts they have. “No, but let me explain. You have to see how awful …”

Stop! I’ll stipulate that it’s awful, and I will win the bet every time that if you continue to bring it to mind, you’ll continue to feel awful. I will suggest that as soon as you mind calms and turns elsewhere, you’ll feel different.

This is very clear to me because I stumbled into the Principles that describe how we create our experience of life, the Principles that show us that experience doesn’t create us. We use the energy of life to generate thoughts, constantly. Our mental activity begins when we come into this world and ends when we leave. We constantly create thoughts, which, when they form in our minds, sets a whole bio-psycho-spiritual chain of events in motion, affecting our chemistry, and thus our feeling state. Bad feelings are not our enemies; they are our navigation system. As soon as our feeling state starts to drop, we can be 100% certain that our thinking is not healthy, wise or functional. Whatever we’re bringing to mind, it’s taking us in a direction we don’t want to go. So bad feelings are not something to cope with; they are something to appreciate and use as a guide to slow our minds down. We can just let our thinking pass without paying a lot of attention to the details, until our minds quiet and better feelings return. They always will. And it happens very quickly because thoughts unexamined pass quickly. We are naturally self-righting, but we also have the free will to keep ourselves off balance. As soon as we let go of trying to figure out, organize or control our thoughts, our innate resiliency brings us right back into balance.

Better feelings, good feelings tell us to trust the thoughts we’re having. Once we are operating from a clear head and a quiet mind, the very “problems” that looked so horrible come into perspective. The past takes its place as the past. Present troubles seem more like situations than insoluble problems, and we start coming up with solutions, rather than frustration and upset.

It’s great to know that we are set up to enjoy life. Yes, we can disrupt that by using our power to think against ourselves. Enjoyment and optimism return quickly when we navigate by our feelings, and recognize when to leave our thinking alone.

The post Feeling Our Way through Life appeared first on Three Principles Living.

Feeling Our Way through Life

People seek help from counselors when they feel bad. No one has ever come into a session with me to complain about their thinking. They come in to say, “I’m really depressed.” “I’m sad and I can’t seem to get over it.” “I am so anxious that I can’t concentrate.” “I get so angry I feel like hitting my children.” That kind of statement.

So, intuitively, we know that bad feelings are a sign that we need help. But we believe the bad feelings are coming from the events, people and circumstances in our life. The expectation people usually start with is that a mentor or counselor will help them to “deal with” their feelings.

They don’t anticipate actually feeling that much better, just coping much better with how bad they feel. They’re usually looking for techniques or strategies, eager to tell me about all the things they’ve already tried that haven’t worked over time. Yoga. Meditation. Art therapy. Long walks. Medication. Massage.

Here’s the thing. If you make a recipe that doesn’t taste good, it’s not going to taste any better if you eat it by candlelight, or eat slowly, or serve bread with it, or use better cutlery, or put flowers on the table. You cooked it. You don’t like it. Smart money says you toss it aside take the recipe out of your recipe file, and stop making it.

Our feelings are the experiences we cook up with the thoughts we bring to mind. If we don’t like them, getting over them is no more of a big deal than scraping a plate into the garbage, avoiding that recipe, and moving on. If you keep cooking up the same combination of stuff, you’ll keep getting the same unpleasant results. We don’t do that with food. Why do it we do it with ourselves?

For me, it was simply not knowing where my feelings were actually coming from. Until someone pointed it out to me, I never noticed that the same people, events and circumstances did not always produce the same feelings, that I often felt completely differently about things at different times. I had just accepted the prevailing view I grew up with that we were always reacting to life, that life could and would make us feel bad or good.

It was a revelation to me that my thinking had anything to do with it. I rejected the whole idea at first. What? I was making myself miserable? I would never do that on purpose! How dare anyone suggest that? But it very quickly dawned on me that if I had the power to make myself miserable, I had the power to make myself anything. Maybe that was actually good news; I could change even if people, events and circumstances around me did not change. Wow!

The only thing in life we really do have any control over is ourselves. We can’t force other people to change; we can’t prevent life events; we can’t pick the historical or demographic circumstances into which we’re born. But we come fully equipped to make the most of our lives, whatever they are. Again, Wow!

We’ve learned to go over and over our same old thinking, trying to understand ourselves, or figure out why we think this or that, or resolve our past traumas by re-living them, hoping they’ll look different to us. As we do this, we feel worse and worse. In my experience of working with people, though, the hardest part of my work is to get them to stop talking about all the negative thoughts they have. “No, but let me explain. You have to see how awful …”

Stop! I’ll stipulate that it’s awful, and I will win the bet every time that if you continue to bring it to mind, you’ll continue to feel awful. I will suggest that as soon as your mind calms and turns elsewhere, you’ll feel different.

This is very clear to me because I stumbled into the Principles that describe how we create our experience of life, the Principles that show us that experience doesn’t create us. We use the energy of life to generate thoughts, constantly. Our mental activity begins when we come into this world and ends when we leave. We constantly create thoughts, which, when they form in our minds, sets a whole bio-psycho-spiritual chain of events in motion, affecting our chemistry, and thus our feeling state. Bad feelings are not our enemies; they are our navigation system. As soon as our feeling state starts to drop, we can be 100% certain that our thinking is not healthy, wise or functional. Whatever we’re bringing to mind, it’s taking us in a direction we don’t want to go. So bad feelings are not something to cope with; they are something to appreciate and use as a guide to slow our minds down. We can just let our thinking pass without paying a lot of attention to the details, until our minds quiet and better feelings return. They always will. And it happens very quickly because thoughts unexamined pass quickly. We are naturally self-righting, but we also have the free will to keep ourselves off balance. As soon as we let go of trying to figure out, organize or control our thoughts, our innate resiliency brings us right back into balance.

Better feelings, good feelings tell us to trust the thoughts we’re having. Once we are operating from a clear head and a quiet mind, the very “problems” that looked so horrible come into perspective. The past takes its place as the past. Present troubles seem more like situations than insoluble problems, and we start coming up with solutions, rather than frustration and upset.

It’s great to know that we are set up to enjoy life. Yes, we can disrupt that by using our power to think against ourselves. Enjoyment and optimism return quickly when we navigate by our feelings, and recognize when to leave our thinking alone.

The post Feeling Our Way through Life appeared first on Three Principles Living.

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