First Responders: Noticing and Getting Curious – Cherie Ray, MLA

First Responders: Noticing and Getting Curious

Recently I noticed that when I considered following a new idea or inspiration about my business, some very familiar thinking would show up almost instantly.  I also began to notice the same dynamic kicked-in when considering the holidays or thinking about other things in my life.  

What I noticed was a flood of very real familiar thinking, very specific to the topic at hand, would show up in my mental conversation.  This immediate-believable-absolute-feeling-seemingly-truthful flavored thinking showed up almost on que to tell me the truth about how life works. 

As I noticed this dynamic happening more and more, these thought patterns occurred to me as my First Responders.  Just like emergency first responders that show up on the scene to support us in times of need, these familiar thinking thought patterns show up on the scene to offer me a helpful dose of my reality.  Something smelled fishy; my mental 1st Responders had a bias toward limitation.  I found this interesting too! 

In the game of life, if you look around, the nature of life is synonymous with potential and possibility.  How could something live in my head, be so familiar, feel so definitive, and not be true about life? In understanding more about our human operating system, we live in a world of thought and then see it as real, so this is where my curiosity kicked in again.  If my First Responders are not telling me the absolute truth about life, what else is there to see to around the topic I’m looking at?  So, it occurred to me to consider there are holes in their stories and to keep my eyes and ears open to seeing something fresh.  Guess what?  New fresh possibilities are coming to me and it can work the same for you.

Here are some bullet points to raise your awareness to your First Responders:

  • 1st Responders are not informing you about how life works.  It’s informing you of how you believe it works.
  • 1st Responders are reflecting your habits of thinking. 
  • 1st Responders are not informing you of what’s possible for you in life.
  • 1st Responders are a mirror to your current mood.  High mood, things look possible.  Low mood, things look bleak.
  • 1st Responders look real and feel true.  Remember, this is all happening in your mind, not in life at the moment.  For example, a busted water pipe in the mind is very different than a busted water pipe in front of you.  The one in front of you is really happening and calling for your immediate attention. The other only exists in the mind but it still feels real.
  • You may always have the same 1st Responders show up on the scene for you, whether they’re historic or futuristic, remember they are still not occurring now.

This is all good news. Why? Because we all get a chance to see more of our humanity as just that, an aspect of being human. Not a problem that needs to be overcome, just something to be aware of.  The more you see the role of thought in the moment, the more relaxed you effortlessly become.  Get curious.  There’s always more to be seen.

 

 

 

 

Cherie Ray, MLA,

Consultant l Coach

Human Potential l Creativity

www.trueyoucreativity.com

www.cherieray.com

832.545.8488

Summer Like a Kid – Cherie Ray, MLA

Have you played outside?  It’s summer!  What’cha waiting on?

Recently, I was sitting at an airport waiting for my luggage to arrive… on the NEXT flight.  My bags weren’t loaded onto my plane.  As I waited, it occurred to me that I could sit and seethe about this inconvenience or I could see what else was available to me. As I found a place to use my $10 inconvenience meal voucher, I settled in to wait. To be transparent, waiting is not my strong suit!

While I waited, I started noticing how many families were moving through the airport. There were kids of every age, shape, and size. I also noticed how distinctly different the experience of moving through the airport was for the adults versus the kiddos.  This got me interested in observing kids.  Since this felt so fresh and new, I was intrigued.  As I watched a big population of passing kids, I observed:

They play.

They talk.

They yell out, Daddy!

They jump for no reason.

They eat.

They sleep.

The sing.

They lead.

They follow.

They seem to grow before your eyes.

They fall out of chairs and scream.

They get a hug and go back to playing.

They wear barrettes.

They wear sweats.

They catch a ride on a leg.

They find a toy in everything.

They look at life with eyes wide open.

As I watched, I got curious about what happens to that easy going, adventurous spirit that seems so natural to the kids.  It didn’t take long before I saw how naturally kids show up and move with the flow of life, at the speed of life.  In a flash, it occurred to me that an invitation was being extended to me to do summer more like a kid and less like a bothered, inconvenienced adult.  Surprisingly, after accepting the invitation, gratitude for the delay showed up, out of the blue.

 

Cherie Ray, MLA, is a 3P coach/consultant for individuals, families, and businesses where collaboration and creativity are elemental to success.

Human Potential — Creativity

www.cherieray.com

Houston, Texas

832.545.8488

Bold Certain and Profound- The Truth Inside Us All – Jacquie Forde

Soundcloud Link to Podcast 

https://soundcloud.com/jacquie-forde/bold-profound-and-certain

Over the last few weeks I have had several high profile discussions with political leaders.

I really enjoy pointing them to a new understanding of how life works, an understanding that has both the potential and the hope to raise the consciousness of individuals and nations, to elevate them above war, famine, greed and hatred. Knowing this understanding will help political leaders illuminate their awareness towards a wellbeing that has no end and just a beautiful knowing that everything is and always will be OK no matter what our circumstances are. An understanding that the human race has simply forgotten; an understanding that will evolve humanity to new levels of consciousness, effortlessly once known and understood.

A BOLD CONVERSATION INDEED SOME SAY …

I have these conversations because I can’t stop myself . I have been quietly undertaking a self funded campaign to bring the Principles to leaders for the past two years building friends, advocates and supporters who both can see the potential for humanity and who have now experienced it personally for themselves.

BUT SOMETHING REALLY SHIFTED LAST WEEK IN HOW I COMMUNICATE THAT MESSAGE.

It revealed itself to me in a bold, profound and certain way as I sat in the Scottish Parliament mid conversation completely hijacking my ensuing discussions in the Parliament and the businesses I was delivering training to that day and ever since. It was subtle, quick and delightful. I fell in love.

 Yeah I know it sounds kindof weird but let me explain.

And for the record it wasn’t the Politician I was sitting in front of…. I fell in love with the very strange experience I was having whilst sitting in front of him. An experience that allowed me to see my all of my thinking playing out in front of me in the first few minutes that we spoke together, whilst my stomach was in knots and my heart was pounding in my chest. You see even though all of this was happening something inside of me recognised that it was a useful experience and I was to do nothing and to let it run its course. By doing this within a few minutes I had fallen in love with this experience because it had shown me yet again to trust in the unknown of any conversation, event or happening and speak from my heart. My conversation became clearer, bolder and more profound when I started to hold this experience lightly.

“I told him I was looking for politicians that were not afraid to be pioneers, who were content with being a lone voice at first in a sea of disbelievers with invested interests. I told him this was a chance for Scotland to lead the world and continue their humanistic policies with a modern psychology that gave people their mental health back firmly in their own hands and gently asked him was he what I was looking for?”

HE SMILED AND TOLD ME HE WAS IN….

As per usual when we let go of what we think we have to say and let the feeling of our certainty in this understanding of The Three Principles carry us forward some pretty amazing things happen.

BUT….

What if we all became more certain, bold and more profound in our understanding of how life really works?

WHO KNOWS BUT MAYBE IT’S TIME TO FIND OUT !!!!

P.S.

On November 15th 2016 Jacquie Forde and Judith Sedgeman will present to an invited audience of around 40-50 politicians, policy makers, third sector organisations, allied health care professionals and others in the Scottish Parliament. 

This is the second Parliament meeting that my non profit organisation,The Wellbeing Alliance has held in the Parliament. On this occasion we will be discussing preventing and solving Scotland’s mental health problems with an understanding of The Principles. The invitation is attached below.

About Jacquie Forde

Jacquie Forde, RGN, RM is an International Speaker, Business Consultant and Life Coach who works with organizations and individuals all over the world via in person and online Business Programs, Individual Coaching, Workshops and Retreats.  She devotes most of her coaching practice to helping people understand the psycho-spiritual principles behind the human experience helping them gain greater clarity and success in life and business.  Jacquie’s work is guided by The Three Principles, a new paradigm in Psychology.

Jacquie is MD of a Strategic Consultancy that primarily works with Blue Chip organizations. She is also the founder and CEO of a non profit Principles-based Campaigning and Wellbeing Consultancy. Jacquie has a wealth of experience as an international speaker, business coach, trainer, activist and a campaigner for political improvements in Scotland and the UK to improve health, mental wellbeing and equality, especially for disadvantaged communities.

When she is not creating projects, campaigning for social justice or helping people understand the human experience Jacquie loves to mentor people to deepen their understanding of the Three Principles. She really enjoys guiding people lost in the midst of parenthood, the glass ceiling and the corporate sticky floor to get clear about living an abundant, joyful life with clarity and purpose.

Jacquie can be contacted at www.jacquieforde.com

                                              www.thewellbeingalliance.com


Being Fooled No More – Bryan Ryan

A client of mine came to see me not so long ago, she was binge eating on food, and putting on a lot of weight.

It was clear from our conversation that she was living with a lot of anxiety, fear and pain in her life, and she said that, “the only time that I feel good in any way, is when I am eating all this food”.

She is doing all of this eating because she thinks that it’s the food that is giving her some sort of relief from the pain  and suffering that she is experiencing.

This is the typical, innocent story that I hear all the time from my clients, whether it’s the food, or the alcohol, or the cigarettes, or the gambling, it’s their way of getting a small bit of relief from the daily drudgery that becomes their life.

Except it’s not the food or the booze or the fags that’s making them feel better, and this is where the innocence comes in, what has caused them to feel better, is quite simply, that their thinking has changed, because the only thing that creates feelings is our thinking, 100%, as a fact of life.

Can it be this simple? Are we really doing all of this stuff because we misunderstand where our feelings and emotions are coming from? Yes and yes.

This misunderstanding that we have all grown up with has caused us all a lot of problems, to say the least, because the truth about what really causes our emotions and feelings, goes across the board, and is true for all areas of our lives.

In our innocence we contaminate an already there, beautiful and peaceful feeling, by believing that it’s our circumstances that cause us to feel anxiety or fear, or a family member that’s treating us a certain way causing us pain, or finances, bully at work, the list goes on and on.

This singular mis-understanding , it could be said, is the cause of all conflict in the world, and we are only starting to wake up to this fact, as this information spreads, and changes people’s lives in un-thought-of ways.

We really are only one thought away from feeling better in any moment, and that’s a fact, whether we know it or not. 

If we know it and understand it deeply, the game changes overnight, the trick that fooled us all, time after time, just does not have the same effect on us anymore.

This change, which comes with the understanding, is the “contamination” falling away, and what’s left is the peaceful, contented feeling that is hard wired within all of us, as the sun shines through when the haze disintegrates.

It’s like if on the news some day they said that “we have just discovered that the world is in fact round, and not flat as we thought it was” or “great news, we have just discovered it’s the sun that is the centre of the universe, not the earth”

 

  

 

 

Being Fooled No More – Bryan Ryan

A client of mine came to see me not so long ago, she was binge eating on food, and putting on a lot of weight.

It was clear from our conversation that she was living with a lot of anxiety, fear and pain in her life, and she said that, “the only time that I feel good in any way, is when I am eating all this food”.

She is doing all of this eating because she thinks that it’s the food that is giving her some sort of relief from the pain  and suffering that she is experiencing.

This is the typical, innocent story that I hear all the time from my clients, whether it’s the food, or the alcohol, or the cigarettes, or the gambling, it’s their way of getting a small bit of relief from the daily drudgery that becomes their life.

Except it’s not the food or the booze or the fags that’s making them feel better, and this is where the innocence comes in, what has caused them to feel better, is quite simply, that their thinking has changed, because the only thing that creates feelings is our thinking, 100%, as a fact of life.

Can it be this simple? Are we really doing all of this stuff because we misunderstand where our feelings and emotions are coming from? Yes and yes.

This misunderstanding that we have all grown up with has caused us all a lot of problems, to say the least, because the truth about what really causes our emotions and feelings, goes across the board, and is true for all areas of our lives.

In our innocence we contaminate an already there, beautiful and peaceful feeling, by believing that it’s our circumstances that cause us to feel anxiety or fear, or a family member that’s treating us a certain way causing us pain, or finances, bully at work, the list goes on and on.

This singular mis-understanding , it could be said, is the cause of all conflict in the world, and we are only starting to wake up to this fact, as this information spreads, and changes people’s lives in un-thought-of ways.

We really are only one thought away from feeling better in any moment, and that’s a fact, whether we know it or not. 

If we know it and understand it deeply, the game changes overnight, the trick that fooled us all, time after time, just does not have the same effect on us anymore.

This change, which comes with the understanding, is the “contamination” falling away, and what’s left is the peaceful, contented feeling that is hard wired within all of us, as the sun shines through when the haze disintegrates.

It’s like if on the news some day they said that “we have just discovered that the world is in fact round, and not flat as we thought it was” or “great news, we have just discovered it’s the sun that is the centre of the universe, not the earth”

 

  

 

 

Falling Back Into Peace of Mind – Bryan Ryan

Our bodies are amazing, made up of 50 trillion cells, each cell like a miniature human being, with all the functions of a human being.

We really are a colony of intelligent cells, all working together in perfect harmony, the perfect model for how a society can live in peace and co-operation.

The body works perfectly, and every cell knows exactly what to do. 

Each cell is affected, moment to moment, by the environment, which is the blood, and the blood is affected, moment by moment, by the chemicals within it, which are created, by the wonderful, creative, movie making capability, which is our thinking.

Our thoughts, which we make up, are marinating our bodies in chemicals, which create our feelings and emotions.

Our emotions and feelings are giving us perfect, moment to moment feedback, about the quality of the movie that we are making up, like a temperature gauge tells us how hot, or how cold it is.

So, we are having a direct effect on our cells, the very fabric of our bodies, by the thoughts that we entertain in our minds.

Like a balance sheet there really are only two moods that we as human beings fluctuate to and from, negative feelings caused by negative thinking, or positive feelings caused by positive thinking.

The free will, which we all have, allows us to choose our thoughts, and is the rudder that we have for our ship that enables us to navigate our journey with more elegance, and spend more time feeling well, confident and secure.

There is a natural intelligent system, before thought, that is running the system perfectly, and is hindered and contaminated by any negative thinking that we allow ourselves to ruminate on.   

 When we let our thinking soften, not take it so seriously (after all we make it all up), and let the system run itself, it does, and we can go along for the ride.

Thinking needs to be done, but not all the time, in fact the more that we allow ourselves to go with the flow, and fall back into the ocean of oneness that is the real us, the more that we have a nicer life.

A clear mind uncontaminated by thinking is our default, natural place to be, and the very essence and source of who and what we all are. 

This is where our true home is, where we feel confident and secure, and aligned with which we are all a part of, universal mind, fueling and running the whole show. 

This is where peace of mind and contentment hang out, on the inside, our true nature, an oasis of peace and security that never goes away, and can’t be broken.


Showing People the Newness of the Principles By Dr. George Pransky

Let’s face it, most human beings don’t like “new”. They don’t mind, “it’s the same with a few differences” and they are okay with “variations on a theme”. But “new” equals resistance!

This is why it took over 20 years for computers to become mainstream after their inception, 30 years for washing one’s hands and sterilizing instruments to become standard medical practices after the discovery of germ theory, and 50 years for the British Navy to issue limes after it was discovered that citric fruits prevent scurvy. 

People that discover the principles are sometimes shocked that it’s been over 30 years since Syd Banks uncovered the principles, yet they are not mainstream. It’s not at all surprising because of people’s resistance to something new. 

When you introduce the principles to people their first reaction is often, “oh, it’s the same as (fill in the blank)” or “just like this except for that”. Of course they’re going to look for similarities because they will be drawn to staying within the known, the familiar. Differences takes them into the unknown and the unknown is not people’s number one preference. 

When presented, the principles will appear to have similarities with many things out there. They share the idea of thought with cognitive therapy. They have similarities with many religions in regards to the values manifested by higher consciousness, and with meditation and prayer in the appreciation of a quiet reflective mind. 

When we focus on or emphasize these similarities in our discussion with people we make it more difficult for them to see the uniqueness, the new discovery that the principles represent: 

  • Syd Banks brought to the world the possibility that a lay person could intuit the deep truths of life as an original source. The world was of the impression that knowledge of psychology and other disciplines had to be learned as derivatives of existing theories and philosophies.
  • Syd Banks uncovered the fact that thought is the sole, exclusive source of human experience. Previously, thought was seen as a major player in human experience but not the only player.
  • Syd Banks pointed to the fact that thought is by nature transient. Since our experience of life is 100% determined by our thinking in each moment, our personal experience of life will vary, however slightly. This phenomenon, commonly called moods, is not problematic to human beings once it is seen for what it is.
  • Syd Banks uncovered an explanation of why our thinking creates our reality. Thought is linked to our senses via consciousness. Previously, many philosophies suggested that thought was related to one’s reality, but the logic behind it was absent. 
  • Spirituality was generally regarded as a journey, a pursuit of something ethereal or ‘out there’. Sydney Banks defined mind in a way that made it omnipresent in life, something that we can realistically intuit and appreciate. He demystified mind by connecting it to our daily experience of life through its manifestations in thought and consciousness. 

Emphasizing the similarities to the already existing philosophies and approaches will make the listener more comfortable in the known, but, I suggest, distracts the listener from the newness and uniqueness of Syd’s message. It’s hard enough stepping into the unknown, or more accurately the “yet to be known”, without having his message obscured by the already familiar.

Sharing the Principles of Mind, Consciousness, and Thought by Elsie Spittle and George Pransky in collaboration with Three Principle Practitioners

Based on the direct teachings of Sydney Banks

The purpose of this document is to offer what we learned from Sydney Banks about how to effectively share our understanding of the Three Principles.

This document is not about the Principles themselves, but exclusively about guidance for sharing the Principles.

Sydney Banks was an ordinary working man who had a spontaneous and profound spiritual experience in 1973. He uncovered the Three Principles that underlie the human experience. These Principles offer the world unparalleled hope and guidance in understanding human psychological functioning and how to foster permanent and positive change.

Shortly after his epiphany, the extraordinary change in Syd himself had a powerful effect on those closest to him. As he began to share what he had realized with lay people, they too began to experience insight and
positive change. The unprecedented transformation in these people, coupled with the evidence that such knowledge could be shared, began to attract the attention of caring people beyond that small community.

Within a few years, professionals from various fields were touched by the understanding and wanted to convey it to others in their professional capacity. Mental health practitioners were the first professionals with whom Syd had close contact. He could see firsthand how they attempted to share their understanding. For example, some tried to teach the Principles in an intellectual way. Others intentionally kept a “clinical distance” from clients.

Syd reminded us that understanding the Principles was a matter of the heart, not the intellect. Because of the nature of the Principles, they do not lend themselves to the traditional methods of education. The learning happens via insight rather than memory based learning.

He told us that sharing with people as fellow human beings would be more effective than positioning ourselves as the “experts.” It was clear to him that the traditional methods we were using (a carryover from our previous approaches) were not well suited to convey this understanding. He mentored us to more effectively share his message.

During his lifetime, Syd provided invaluable guidance that has helped us share the Principles effectively throughout our careers. As people who were fortunate enough to spend time being mentored by Syd, it is our fondest hope that highlighting what is most meaningful to us from his guidance will empower future generations in their work as practitioners, and help us all share the Three Principles with the wider world with greater depth and purity.

This document is not designed to serve as a substitute for Syd’s material. His materials provide the context and depth not possible in this short summary. Including his materials in one’s practice is the only way we know to provide direct exposure to the deepest/purest expression of the Principles. All of us who contributed to this document have found Syd's materials an integral part of our work with clients, as well as our own learning.

We learned from Syd that the most powerful place to look and to point people toward is 'before the formation of thought' or, said another way, the nature of the Principles. This does not preclude discussing how
people use the Principles in their lives, because this discussion can be helpful in the education process. He simply taught us that realizing the nature of the Principles is what changes lives. Speaking to the nature of the Principles offers a broader understanding of who and what we really are, at our core.

The Three Principles are universal and spiritual in nature. Spiritual, in that they are both form and formless; universal, because they apply not only to everyone but to everything. They do not originate in the psychology of each person, but rather derive from the formless energy behind life, just as the physiological heart beat comes from the life force, not from the heart itself. The Principles are the all-inclusive expression of what Syd uncovered. As the heart/core of this understanding, they are the foundation of our teaching.

Here are the key points Syd would point us toward:

  1. Health of the helper

    What ultimately qualifies a teacher is the extent to which that person reflects and demonstrates the quality of life that clients desire (we call it “grounding”), and the teacher’s ability to share what he or she understands that accounts for that quality of life. A teacher’s education, experience and ability to articulate might leverage their grounding, but the grounding itself is the most valuable quality that practitioners bring to the table. We have learned that the best way to increase our effectiveness as practitioners is to increase our level of understanding, by looking deeper into the Principles on an ongoing basis.

  2. Look to people's innate mental health, not their symptomology

    There is a wisdom and logic to the Principles that exists in all living things. Seeing this fact, and seeing that your client is no exception, allows practitioners to see beyond clients’ symptomology. Seeing that people already have mental health within them provides hope for the practitioner as well as the client, independent of a client’s level of functioning. The practitioner’s job isn’t one of getting across information, “fixing” clients, or putting something into clients, but rather helping clients to awaken to their own wisdom.

  3. Insight/pure intelligence

    The realization of innate wisdom or pure intelligence comes from within the listener via insight. Everyone has innate wisdom within him/her. Wisdom is realized in real time, via personal insight. This is where lasting mental and behavioral change occurs.

  4. Deepening levels of consciousness

    Deepening levels of consciousness is a matter of the heart and not of the intellect. True understanding will bypass the intellect. We have learned to keep the message simple rather than analytical and complicated. Syd taught us that although there is a connection between the Principles and the psychological and intellectual capacities of

humanity, the most powerful place to look and to point to is the spiritual nature of life, to talk about universal intelligence as it relates to Mind, Consciousness and Thought.

  1. A conversation between friends

    There is a great value in leveling the playing field and talking with clients as if it were a conversation between friends. What would traditionally be called “teaching” shifts more to drawing wisdom out from clients and has the feeling of “sharing.”

  2. Listening to truth

    We learned from Syd that the truth of the Principles can only be seen via insight. No manner of trying to figure things out ever really helped. Insight is not limited by anything. It can happen at any time from any state of mind. That said, however, a quiet, reflective mind is a more conducive medium for insight rather than an active, analytical listening process.

  3. Listening to clients

    We learned to listen beyond the client’s story to hear their wisdom, and to point them in that direction. This will help them see that they know what to do, no matter what their history has been, or what has happened to them.

  4. Stick to what you know

    It is important that we stick with what we know (what is real for us) and not try to talk beyond our grounding. When we share only what we know, we will see more. What we know now is more than enough for now. Syd often said that "what little we know might be decades ahead of its time."

9. Sharing our story

Some things don’t lend themselves to direct, easy expression. The Principles fall into that category. Stories and metaphors can be helpful in this regard. Syd also encouraged us to share our own personal story (how we came to understand the Principles and what we saw for ourselves). We learned that sharing our story brings our understanding of the Principles to life. It is the deep feeling of well-being that occurs when we share our story that helps awaken the innate mental health in those with whom we are speaking. Our story will also point to the results produced by our usage of the Principles and provide hope.

10. Connecting the dots

When people have insights, they change. They see and hear differently and feel different, but they may not always realize this at first. Pointing this out in the context of our clients’ results has great value. It releases a feeling of hope. The feeling the client is experiencing is more informative to the practitioner than the client’s grasp of the content.

11. Stick to the Principles

Syd reminded us that everyone has the wisdom and understanding within themselves to stabilize and solve their problems. Practitioner techniques intended to “improve client wellbeing” disempower people, because they undermine the message that they have all they need within themselves. The Principles empower people by pointing them to their own wisdom, creativity and natural resilience.

12. Trust your inner wisdom/pure intelligence

Ultimately, we all want to trust and follow our own wisdom, what we personally understand. That said, we also want to be open to hearing/seeing more than we do right now. This means listening from within, and being open to hearing something new; something that will deepen our grounding and growth. Syd expressed that point eloquently by saying: “Don’t be a follower; a listener, yes, but not a follower.”

13. Having your heart in the right place

Not long after Sydney Banks had his profound experience, he knew that what he had realized would be of great help to humanity. He set his sights on being of service and encouraged those who learned from him to point in that direction as well. While Three Principles practitioners obviously need to make a living, it is wise to allow being in service to take precedence over personal gain. When we focus on service rather than feathering our own nest, we will find our teaching more fulfilling and impactful. We have seen time and again that when our priority is being in service to humanity and being true to our own wisdom, the practical aspects of life inevitably fall into place; often in ways we couldn’t possibly have imagined.

Acknowledgements

This document is a collaborative effort to share the combined insights, understanding and vision of a group of practitioners and lay people whose lives were profoundly touched by their encounters with Sydney Banks and the mentoring he provided over a period of decades.

First and foremost, we are deeply grateful, beyond measure, to Sydney Banks, for sharing his profound insight of the Three Principles with all of us, and with the world. Without his lifelong dedication to alleviating the suffering of humanity, serving as a beacon to us all, this message of hope and transformation wouldn’t be sweeping the world as it is now.

It is our fondest hope that this collaborative effort will be meaningful and helpful to those ever growing numbers of people and practitioners who are or will become dedicated to sharing this profound understanding with a world in need.

Original idea: Dr. Jack Pransky
Co-authors: Dr. George Pransky and Elsie Spittle Co-signers:
Jack Pransky
Christine Heath
Judith Sedgeman
Dicken Bettinger
Mark Howard
Rita Shuford
William Pettit
Chip Chipman
Jan Chipman
Catherine Casey
Judy Banks
Linda Pransky

Sharing the Principles of Mind, Consciousness, and Thought by Elsie Spittle and George Pransky in collaboration with Three Principle practitioners

Based on the direct teachings of Sydney Banks

The purpose of this document is to offer what we learned from Sydney Banks about how to effectively share our understanding of the Three Principles.

This document is not about the Principles themselves, but exclusively about guidance for sharing the Principles.

Sydney Banks was an ordinary working man who had a spontaneous and profound spiritual experience in 1973. He uncovered the Three Principles that underlie the human experience. These Principles offer the world unparalleled hope and guidance in understanding human psychological functioning and how to foster permanent and positive change.

Shortly after his epiphany, the extraordinary change in Syd himself had a powerful effect on those closest to him. As he began to share what he had realized with lay people, they too began to experience insight and
positive change. The unprecedented transformation in these people, coupled with the evidence that such knowledge could be shared, began to attract the attention of caring people beyond that small community.

Within a few years, professionals from various fields were touched by the understanding and wanted to convey it to others in their professional capacity. Mental health practitioners were the first professionals with whom Syd had close contact. He could see firsthand how they attempted to share their understanding. For example, some tried to teach the Principles in an intellectual way. Others intentionally kept a “clinical distance” from clients.

Syd reminded us that understanding the Principles was a matter of the heart, not the intellect. Because of the nature of the Principles, they do not lend themselves to the traditional methods of education. The learning happens via insight rather than memory based learning.

He told us that sharing with people as fellow human beings would be more effective than positioning ourselves as the “experts.” It was clear to him that the traditional methods we were using (a carryover from our previous approaches) were not well suited to convey this understanding. He mentored us to more effectively share his message.

During his lifetime, Syd provided invaluable guidance that has helped us share the Principles effectively throughout our careers. As people who were fortunate enough to spend time being mentored by Syd, it is our fondest hope that highlighting what is most meaningful to us from his guidance will empower future generations in their work as practitioners, and help us all share the Three Principles with the wider world with greater depth and purity.

This document is not designed to serve as a substitute for Syd’s material. His materials provide the context and depth not possible in this short summary. Including his materials in one’s practice is the only way we know to provide direct exposure to the deepest/purest expression of the Principles. All of us who contributed to this document have found Syd's materials an integral part of our work with clients, as well as our own learning.

We learned from Syd that the most powerful place to look and to point people toward is 'before the formation of thought' or, said another way, the nature of the Principles. This does not preclude discussing how
people use the Principles in their lives, because this discussion can be helpful in the education process. He simply taught us that realizing the nature of the Principles is what changes lives. Speaking to the nature of the Principles offers a broader understanding of who and what we really are, at our core.

The Three Principles are universal and spiritual in nature. Spiritual, in that they are both form and formless; universal, because they apply not only to everyone but to everything. They do not originate in the psychology of each person, but rather derive from the formless energy behind life, just as the physiological heart beat comes from the life force, not from the heart itself. The Principles are the all-inclusive expression of what Syd uncovered. As the heart/core of this understanding, they are the foundation of our teaching.

Here are the key points Syd would point us toward:

  1. Health of the helper

    What ultimately qualifies a teacher is the extent to which that person reflects and demonstrates the quality of life that clients desire (we call it “grounding”), and the teacher’s ability to share what he or she understands that accounts for that quality of life. A teacher’s education, experience and ability to articulate might leverage their grounding, but the grounding itself is the most valuable quality that practitioners bring to the table. We have learned that the best way to increase our effectiveness as practitioners is to increase our level of understanding, by looking deeper into the Principles on an ongoing basis.

  2. Look to people's innate mental health, not their symptomology

    There is a wisdom and logic to the Principles that exists in all living things. Seeing this fact, and seeing that your client is no exception, allows practitioners to see beyond clients’ symptomology. Seeing that people already have mental health within them provides hope for the practitioner as well as the client, independent of a client’s level of functioning. The practitioner’s job isn’t one of getting across information, “fixing” clients, or putting something into clients, but rather helping clients to awaken to their own wisdom.

  3. Insight/pure intelligence

    The realization of innate wisdom or pure intelligence comes from within the listener via insight. Everyone has innate wisdom within him/her. Wisdom is realized in real time, via personal insight. This is where lasting mental and behavioral change occurs.

  4. Deepening levels of consciousness

    Deepening levels of consciousness is a matter of the heart and not of the intellect. True understanding will bypass the intellect. We have learned to keep the message simple rather than analytical and complicated. Syd taught us that although there is a connection between the Principles and the psychological and intellectual capacities of

humanity, the most powerful place to look and to point to is the spiritual nature of life, to talk about universal intelligence as it relates to Mind, Consciousness and Thought.

  1. A conversation between friends

    There is a great value in leveling the playing field and talking with clients as if it were a conversation between friends. What would traditionally be called “teaching” shifts more to drawing wisdom out from clients and has the feeling of “sharing.”

  2. Listening to truth

    We learned from Syd that the truth of the Principles can only be seen via insight. No manner of trying to figure things out ever really helped. Insight is not limited by anything. It can happen at any time from any state of mind. That said, however, a quiet, reflective mind is a more conducive medium for insight rather than an active, analytical listening process.

  3. Listening to clients

    We learned to listen beyond the client’s story to hear their wisdom, and to point them in that direction. This will help them see that they know what to do, no matter what their history has been, or what has happened to them.

  4. Stick to what you know

    It is important that we stick with what we know (what is real for us) and not try to talk beyond our grounding. When we share only what we know, we will see more. What we know now is more than enough for now. Syd often said that "what little we know might be decades ahead of its time."

9. Sharing our story

Some things don’t lend themselves to direct, easy expression. The Principles fall into that category. Stories and metaphors can be helpful in this regard. Syd also encouraged us to share our own personal story (how we came to understand the Principles and what we saw for ourselves). We learned that sharing our story brings our understanding of the Principles to life. It is the deep feeling of well-being that occurs when we share our story that helps awaken the innate mental health in those with whom we are speaking. Our story will also point to the results produced by our usage of the Principles and provide hope.

10. Connecting the dots

When people have insights, they change. They see and hear differently and feel different, but they may not always realize this at first. Pointing this out in the context of our clients’ results has great value. It releases a feeling of hope. The feeling the client is experiencing is more informative to the practitioner than the client’s grasp of the content.

11. Stick to the Principles

Syd reminded us that everyone has the wisdom and understanding within themselves to stabilize and solve their problems. Practitioner techniques intended to “improve client wellbeing” disempower people, because they undermine the message that they have all they need within themselves. The Principles empower people by pointing them to their own wisdom, creativity and natural resilience.

12. Trust your inner wisdom/pure intelligence

Ultimately, we all want to trust and follow our own wisdom, what we personally understand. That said, we also want to be open to hearing/seeing more than we do right now. This means listening from within, and being open to hearing something new; something that will deepen our grounding and growth. Syd expressed that point eloquently by saying: “Don’t be a follower; a listener, yes, but not a follower.”

13. Having your heart in the right place

Not long after Sydney Banks had his profound experience, he knew that what he had realized would be of great help to humanity. He set his sights on being of service and encouraged those who learned from him to point in that direction as well. While Three Principles practitioners obviously need to make a living, it is wise to allow being in service to take precedence over personal gain. When we focus on service rather than feathering our own nest, we will find our teaching more fulfilling and impactful. We have seen time and again that when our priority is being in service to humanity and being true to our own wisdom, the practical aspects of life inevitably fall into place; often in ways we couldn’t possibly have imagined.

Acknowledgements

This document is a collaborative effort to share the combined insights, understanding and vision of a group of practitioners and lay people whose lives were profoundly touched by their encounters with Sydney Banks and the mentoring he provided over a period of decades.

First and foremost, we are deeply grateful, beyond measure, to Sydney Banks, for sharing his profound insight of the Three Principles with all of us, and with the world. Without his lifelong dedication to alleviating the suffering of humanity, serving as a beacon to us all, this message of hope and transformation wouldn’t be sweeping the world as it is now.

It is our fondest hope that this collaborative effort will be meaningful and helpful to those ever growing numbers of people and practitioners who are or will become dedicated to sharing this profound understanding with a world in need.

Original idea: Dr. Jack Pransky
Co-authors: Dr. George Pransky and Elsie Spittle Co-signers:
Jack Pransky
Christine Heath
Judith Sedgeman
Dicken Bettinger
Mark Howard
Rita Shuford
William Pettit
Chip Chipman
Jan Chipman
Catherine Casey
Judy Banks
Linda Pransky

Bouncing Back! Resilience for Ourselves Means Resilience for Our Families by Ami Chen

This morning saw a major kerfuffle in our household. Has this happened to you? You wake up on the wrong side of the bed, and then your kid or someone else in your family has a bad moment, and you react, they react—and thus ensues a delightful downward spiral of upset … until one kid is perhaps crying, and perhaps you also are about to cry, or throw something at the wall, or storm off to a neighborhood bar (if only one were open at 7:30 in the morning!)

You might see these incidents as thought storms, and if we can see them as such, the storm clouds pass, and we can welcome the sun of a clearer mind back pretty quickly. For me, “resilience” means returning to a more flexible mind, a more natural state of caring and compassion for ourselves, and our families that always lies within us.

That also happened this morning, when my youngest (who was crying because I raised my voice and told her she could no longer watch a TV show which was making her afraid of things … like, taking showers) suddenly was able to shake it all off, and say she was sorry. I, in turn, told her I would sit with her, near the shower when she bathed, for as long as she needed me to until she was no longer scared. This calming down happened within the space of 10 minutes or so. (The TV show is still banned.)

The danger of thought storms is that because of resultant intense feelings from such storms, we can begin to gather “evidence” for our feelings in the form of more negative thoughts. As we accept and believe these new thoughts, as we add fuel to our mental fire, resiliency or “bouncing back” begins to seem more and more distant.

I have worked for many years helping people see the connection between their thoughts and their resultant feelings. They begin to see that what they think is not necessarily true, and certainly, the “taking it personally” part is always optional.

They begin to see the distance to resiliency as the simple measure of a thought … either we follow a thought to its bitter end (or rather, miserable endlessness) or we let it go.

Sometimes, the best we can do is just not take our current thinking so seriously. This does not mean we never have a negative thought or feeling again in our lifetimes. It simply means that resiliency becomes a moment-to-moment experience, and not an in-born personality trait, or special skill. We all have resilience (the capacity to come back to our natural state of love, of simple being-ness). Although most of us will not escape the occasional thought storm, the way we handle such storms is our modeling for our children. Do we have to take a negative thought or judgment (of another, of ourselves) into the rest of our day, month … or life?

Even some of the “worst” moments in my marriage, for example, have come and gone quickly because I and my husband have refused to make a lot of meaning out of some kind of ego eruption between us. The ego will always react defensively, angrily. And being human means that we will be subject to “ego” from time to time. Yet, as a very wise person once said to me: “You can never get rid of the ego, but you can find out what it is, so that it does not control you.”* What is the ego? A kind of thinking. A kind of thinking that comes and goes, and actually begins to diminish as we shine the light of awareness on it.

We can hope for many things for our children, and for others in our families. But there is one thing we can always do on a daily basis that will help them more than all of our hopes and dreams for them. We can become more resilient ourselves. We can begin to see Thought in action. As we see ourselves more often as simply caught up in the human condition (like everyone else on the planet), caught up in Thought, we begin to transcend our own suffering, and become a part of the answer: for our children, for our world.

Ami Chen Mills-Naim is a mother of two and author of The Spark Inside: A Special Book for Youth and State of Mind in the Classroom. She leads a monthly drop-in class at Santa Cruz Yoga, including one this Saturday, April 16, 1:30-3:30 pm ($15 class fee). Ami is also a global speaker and wellness coach, with ongoing retreats and events worldwide. Find more at www.AmiChen.com