Love: It’s Not What You Think

 

Love is the stillness between thoughts.

Love is the safe space of wisdom.

Love is the clear light of creativity.

Love is the gentle attendant of fearlessness.

Love is the greatest gift of humanity.

Love generates the ideas that transform us and bring us peace.

Love recedes in the face of fear, but it does not disappear. It lodges deep in our hearts and faithfully awaits the moment of silence into which it will re-emerge.

When we open ourselves for even a moment to that silence, love never sleeps through it. Love shines into our minds and illuminates hope and possibility.

Love is the constant current that flows eternally beneath the turmoil of our thinking, the perfectly reliable movement stirring us to find comfort in the fluidity of life without getting distracted by the ups or downs.

No matter what we think about it, no matter the words we use, love is not what we think or what we say. Love is a spiritual force, the deep aliveness that is the essence of being before we think about it.

We are born in love. Just look at the innocent, bright-eyed curiosity and enthusiasm on any small child’s face, and you see that pure love. It is neither conditional nor specific. It is just unfettered engagement in life flowing through each person, most obvious before it is papered over by personal thinking.

We know it is at the heart of human experience because it is, and has always been, at the foundation of every significant religious framework we have known. It is the common good at the core of the experience of mankind. It is who we are before we think about who we are. It is the beautiful feeling most natural to us, before we learn to use our own power to think to fill our lives with the infinitude of possible experiences.

Love is like the pilot light of our emotional life. Feed it, and it burns where we need it. Starve it, and it flickers on, always ready, always there, always and ever the resource we have whenever we seek it.

We can turn our backs on love and nurture our personal emotional thinking whenever, and for however long, we choose. But as soon as we let it pass and look to quiet, love comes to light again. Love soothes us and draws us back into the dance of life, the easy movement with and around the other dancers, feeling the music of our common heartbeat and the joy of moving freely through time.

The Principles lead us back to love, to the purity of thought which offers us a non-judgmental fresh start moment-to-moment-to-moment. More and more people across the globe are drawn to see them at work behind life — the formless energy of mind pulsing through infinitude, the individual ability to think allowing each of us to make up whatever we want, the power of consciousness bringing those thoughts to awareness as our individual realities. More and more people are realizing that pure formless energy is love, and love is always the answer.

Photo by Robert Scott https://www.flickr.com/photos/zackie/6045641820

My love is like a red, red rose;

Its fragrance fills the air;

It guides me to a place of light,

Instead of dark despair.

                                                                                                                                   Sydney Banks

 

It is a good time in history to ask people to re-read the whole chapter on Love and Forgiveness in Sydney Banks’ The Missing Link., pp. 117-124.

As Mr. Banks reminded us, “A mind full of love and good feelings can never go wrong.”

 

The post Love: It’s Not What You Think appeared first on Three Principles Living.

Showing People the Newness of the Principles By Dr. George Pransky

Let’s face it, most human beings don’t like “new”. They don’t mind, “it’s the same with a few differences” and they are okay with “variations on a theme”. But “new” equals resistance!

This is why it took over 20 years for computers to become mainstream after their inception, 30 years for washing one’s hands and sterilizing instruments to become standard medical practices after the discovery of germ theory, and 50 years for the British Navy to issue limes after it was discovered that citric fruits prevent scurvy. 

People that discover the principles are sometimes shocked that it’s been over 30 years since Syd Banks uncovered the principles, yet they are not mainstream. It’s not at all surprising because of people’s resistance to something new. 

When you introduce the principles to people their first reaction is often, “oh, it’s the same as (fill in the blank)” or “just like this except for that”. Of course they’re going to look for similarities because they will be drawn to staying within the known, the familiar. Differences takes them into the unknown and the unknown is not people’s number one preference. 

When presented, the principles will appear to have similarities with many things out there. They share the idea of thought with cognitive therapy. They have similarities with many religions in regards to the values manifested by higher consciousness, and with meditation and prayer in the appreciation of a quiet reflective mind. 

When we focus on or emphasize these similarities in our discussion with people we make it more difficult for them to see the uniqueness, the new discovery that the principles represent: 

  • Syd Banks brought to the world the possibility that a lay person could intuit the deep truths of life as an original source. The world was of the impression that knowledge of psychology and other disciplines had to be learned as derivatives of existing theories and philosophies.
  • Syd Banks uncovered the fact that thought is the sole, exclusive source of human experience. Previously, thought was seen as a major player in human experience but not the only player.
  • Syd Banks pointed to the fact that thought is by nature transient. Since our experience of life is 100% determined by our thinking in each moment, our personal experience of life will vary, however slightly. This phenomenon, commonly called moods, is not problematic to human beings once it is seen for what it is.
  • Syd Banks uncovered an explanation of why our thinking creates our reality. Thought is linked to our senses via consciousness. Previously, many philosophies suggested that thought was related to one’s reality, but the logic behind it was absent. 
  • Spirituality was generally regarded as a journey, a pursuit of something ethereal or ‘out there’. Sydney Banks defined mind in a way that made it omnipresent in life, something that we can realistically intuit and appreciate. He demystified mind by connecting it to our daily experience of life through its manifestations in thought and consciousness. 

Emphasizing the similarities to the already existing philosophies and approaches will make the listener more comfortable in the known, but, I suggest, distracts the listener from the newness and uniqueness of Syd’s message. It’s hard enough stepping into the unknown, or more accurately the “yet to be known”, without having his message obscured by the already familiar.

Why Doing Nothing (to find Clarity of Mind) is the Best Policy

What follows is a simple story that reveals the power of doing nothing to find clarity of mind when anxious feelings occur. Hope it resonates and sparks.

Garret

 

P.S.  Here’s a special offer for those of you coming to New Jersey for the PGA Championship next week (or whomever lives close by). On Monday evening July 25, Sean Foley and I will be giving a talk titled: “A New Paradigm in Mental Performance.” I’d like to invite you as my guest. If interested, simply respond to this email and we’ll send you the details.

Look forward to seeing some of you there!

G

Blindsided

It happens to everyone. Flooded with powerful feelings of anger, or outrage, or panic, or sorrow, we do or say things that are well beyond the pale. We can’t believe it. Anyone can be blindsided by emotions, without any understanding of what is happening

Is there a person among us who cannot find the humility to admit that during our lives we have done and said things that later shocked us, things that we would give anything to reverse or take back?

Sometimes it is fleeting. It comes as a blitzkrieg of excitation, flashing into our routine so vividly we react without hesitation. When that occurs, terrible things happen, but they do not persist. In any way we can, we try to make amends when the compulsion passes, or we stoically face the consequences for irremediable actions we felt helpless to prevent in that moment.

When it is chronic, however, we appear to be in serious trouble. When it is chronic and pervasive, we are alienated, and we stumble together into one of the circles of hell with no idea of how to climb out of it.

That is the condition of many parts of the world today: Human beings chronically blindsided by overwhelming feelings that lead them into saying and doing negative, destructive, even horrifying, things. Human beings falling into a chronic state of agitation and upset, not knowing where it is coming from, and not knowing how to get out of it. When we don’t have an answer, we look outside ourselves, desperately, for anyone, anything, who says they do.

A simple, universal answer is available to, actually is innate to, everyone on earth. Peace of mind is intrinsic, generated internally, and within our reach. Precipitous emotions are not calls to immediate action; rather they are our internal warning systems that we need to slow down, stop, await wisdom. Violent emotions are like the sirens that go off when tornadoes are coming; they tell us to stay calm, take shelter, wait quietly until the storm passes. Psychologically, what that looks like is recognizing the urgency for what it is (a flood of insecure thoughts), allowing the thought storm to pass — doing as little as possible when we feel a rush of destructive emotions pushing us to act precipitously.

With understanding of how we function psychologically, with knowledge of our true nature as the thinkers of our own thoughts, creators of our own experience, we have no need to lash out — or to blame ourselves or anyone else. We have the absolute power simply to act on thoughts that arise during clear-headed states of mind, and to step aside from thoughts that arise as overwhelming emotional upheavals.

We can see that this, as everything, is a matter of degree. If we see it in the small, distressing things in life, we can see how the same process is at work in the big, terrible things, only magnified. So here is a simple example.

Before I learned the Principles underlying our experience of life, I was CEO of a company that — among other things — operated medical billing for a number of doctors’ offices. It was before the dawn of desktop computing; we ran a mini-computer system that was programed by expensive experts who came from out of town. Every time some small rule changed in the way billing was submitted, we had to fly the programmers in and shut down for a day or more while they changed the system to accommodate the new forms. Medicare, especially, seemed prone to issuing new directives frequently, some of them changing nothing more than the location of a certain bit of information on a complex form. As the owner of a business that was operating on small margins generated by the volume of billing we handled and the timeliness with which we handled it, I fretted that this was very costly to us. When seemingly unimportant changes arrived from insurers, I would be incensed. I knew better than to take it out on my employees, but my office had a big window to the general work area and I would fly into reactions that anyone could see and hear.

As I was starting to learn the Principles, I realized how ridiculous that was. Nothing I said or did was going to change the situation. We had to continually find economical ways to adjust to the reality of our business. Getting upset was a drain on my well-being and a waste of my time, as well as distressing to those around me. As the truth of the inside-out nature of life dawned on me, I realized I did not have to get upset; it was within my power to allow upsetting thoughts to pass without acting on them, to quiet down and wait for better answers to occur to me in a calm state of mind.

Shortly after that awakening, we got another one of those notices. My assistant put the mail on my desk, and scurried back to her desk, watching for my reaction. I read the notice. A torrent of angry thoughts came to mind. I took them as a warning to sit down and stay quiet until they passed. So I just sat at my desk and looked out the window until I calmed down.

A few minutes later one of my employees knocked on my door. She was taking computer classes, she said, and she thought she would be able to re-program our system for the changes that came in. At least, she said she would like to give it a try.

“How long have you thought that?” I asked.

“Several months, since I’ve been taking these courses,” she said, “but I was always afraid to talk to you about it because the subject made you so mad. I didn’t think you would listen. I didn’t want you to yell at me. But you seem different today so I got up the courage to tell you. I am not sure I can do it, but if you give me a chance, I am sure I will not in any way damage our system by trying.”

She was able to do it, saving us thousands of dollars and hours of time. The only barrier between her success and our company’s well-being was my self-absorbed anger. I could not blame the insurance industry, the mailman, the “system.” The answer was sitting outside my door and I had been too angry and too emotionally reactive to allow it in.

That was the first of many humbling experiences I have had — and continue to have — as I realized more and more clearly the consequences of giving in to insecure thinking, negative emotions, and reactive impulses. Every day, I see more and more clearly that I am only one thought away from a completely different experience of the same external events. As I see that in myself, and in others, it is difficult not to long for the day when every child on the planet is taught the simple psychological logic of life. We live from the spirit, the breath of life, that empowers everything we do, including the ability to generate thoughts and see them as real. And including the free will we have to take any thoughts, any interpretation of our own reality, seriously, or not. Our guidance system is our emotional state, our state of mind.

An upset state of mind may feel urgent, but it is not the clarion call to action; it is the warning siren to take shelter from all those negative feelings. It is the signal to find safety within our fundamental understanding that peace of mind, clarity, creativity, new answers, a whole different perspective, is only one thought away.

The doorway to that new thought is quietude. It is always open.


*The illustration above was drawn a year ago by my grandson, Anthony Quesen, then age 16. It is 2/3 of a large triptych. I have placed the entire triptych below to be fair to the artist and honor his permission to me to extract a portion of it. I felt it captured the contrast between emotional upheaval and reflection.

The post Blindsided appeared first on Three Principles Living.

Blindsided

It happens to everyone. Flooded with powerful feelings of anger, or outrage, or panic, or sorrow, we do or say things that are well beyond the pale. We can’t believe it. Anyone can be blindsided by emotions, without any understanding of what is happening

Is there a person among us who cannot find the humility to admit that during our lives we have done and said things that later shocked us, things that we would give anything to reverse or take back?

Sometimes it is fleeting. It comes as a blitzkrieg of excitation, flashing into our routine so vividly we react without hesitation. When that occurs, terrible things happen, but they do not persist. In any way we can, we try to make amends when the compulsion passes, or we stoically face the consequences for irremediable actions we felt helpless to prevent in that moment.

When it is chronic, however, we appear to be in serious trouble. When it is chronic and pervasive, we are alienated, and we stumble together into one of the circles of hell with no idea of how to climb out of it.

That is the condition of many parts of the world today: Human beings chronically blindsided by overwhelming feelings that lead them into saying and doing negative, destructive, even horrifying, things. Human beings falling into a chronic state of agitation and upset, not knowing where it is coming from, and not knowing how to get out of it. When we don’t have an answer, we look outside ourselves, desperately, for anyone, anything, who says they do.

A simple, universal answer is available to, actually is innate to, everyone on earth. Peace of mind is intrinsic, generated internally, and within our reach. Precipitous emotions are not calls to immediate action; rather they are our internal warning systems that we need to slow down, stop, await wisdom. Violent emotions are like the sirens that go off when tornadoes are coming; they tell us to stay calm, take shelter, wait quietly until the storm passes. Psychologically, what that looks like is recognizing the urgency for what it is (a flood of insecure thoughts), allowing the thought storm to pass — doing as little as possible when we feel a rush of destructive emotions pushing us to act precipitously.

With understanding of how we function psychologically, with knowledge of our true nature as the thinkers of our own thoughts, creators of our own experience, we have no need to lash out — or to blame ourselves or anyone else. We have the absolute power simply to act on thoughts that arise during clear-headed states of mind, and to step aside from thoughts that arise as overwhelming emotional upheavals.

We can see that this, as everything, is a matter of degree. If we see it in the small, distressing things in life, we can see how the same process is at work in the big, terrible things, only magnified. So here is a simple example.

Before I learned the Principles underlying our experience of life, I was CEO of a company that — among other things — operated medical billing for a number of doctors’ offices. It was before the dawn of desktop computing; we ran a mini-computer system that was programed by expensive experts who came from out of town. Every time some small rule changed in the way billing was submitted, we had to fly the programmers in and shut down for a day or more while they changed the system to accommodate the new forms. Medicare, especially, seemed prone to issuing new directives frequently, some of them changing nothing more than the location of a certain bit of information on a complex form. As the owner of a business that was operating on small margins generated by the volume of billing we handled and the timeliness with which we handled it, I fretted that this was very costly to us. When seemingly unimportant changes arrived from insurers, I would be incensed. I knew better than to take it out on my employees, but my office had a big window to the general work area and I would fly into reactions that anyone could see and hear.

As I was starting to learn the Principles, I realized how ridiculous that was. Nothing I said or did was going to change the situation. We had to continually find economical ways to adjust to the reality of our business. Getting upset was a drain on my well-being and a waste of my time, as well as distressing to those around me. As the truth of the inside-out nature of life dawned on me, I realized I did not have to get upset; it was within my power to allow upsetting thoughts to pass without acting on them, to quiet down and wait for better answers to occur to me in a calm state of mind.

Shortly after that awakening, we got another one of those notices. My assistant put the mail on my desk, and scurried back to her desk, watching for my reaction. I read the notice. A torrent of angry thoughts came to mind. I took them as a warning to sit down and stay quiet until they passed. So I just sat at my desk and looked out the window until I calmed down.

A few minutes later one of my employees knocked on my door. She was taking computer classes, she said, and she thought she would be able to re-program our system for the changes that came in. At least, she said she would like to give it a try.

“How long have you thought that?” I asked.

“Several months, since I’ve been taking these courses,” she said, “but I was always afraid to talk to you about it because the subject made you so mad. I didn’t think you would listen. I didn’t want you to yell at me. But you seem different today so I got up the courage to tell you. I am not sure I can do it, but if you give me a chance, I am sure I will not in any way damage our system by trying.”

She was able to do it, saving us thousands of dollars and hours of time. The only barrier between her success and our company’s well-being was my self-absorbed anger. I could not blame the insurance industry, the mailman, the “system.” The answer was sitting outside my door and I had been too angry and too emotionally reactive to allow it in.

That was the first of many humbling experiences I have had — and continue to have — as I realized more and more clearly the consequences of giving in to insecure thinking, negative emotions, and reactive impulses. Every day, I see more and more clearly that I am only one thought away from a completely different experience of the same external events. As I see that in myself, and in others, it is difficult not to long for the day when every child on the planet is taught the simple psychological logic of life. We live from the spirit, the breath of life, that empowers everything we do, including the ability to generate thoughts and see them as real. And including the free will we have to take any thoughts, any interpretation of our own reality, seriously, or not. Our guidance system is our emotional state, our state of mind.

An upset state of mind may feel urgent, but it is not the clarion call to action; it is the warning siren to take shelter from all those negative feelings. It is the signal to find safety within our fundamental understanding that peace of mind, clarity, creativity, new answers, a whole different perspective, is only one thought away.

The doorway to that new thought is quietude. It is always open.


*The illustration above was drawn a year ago by my grandson, Anthony Quesen, then age 16. It is 2/3 of a large triptych. I have placed the entire triptych below to be fair to the artist and honor his permission to me to extract a portion of it. I felt it captured the contrast between emotional upheaval and reflection.

The post Blindsided appeared first on Three Principles Living.