Giving Up The Search

“”You are as close to Truth right this second as you ever will be. Why don’t you just learn to relax and appreciate what you have in life? When you do, I guarantee that you’ll stand a far greater chance of finding what you are looking for than by running all over the world looking for it.”

“My advice is: still your mind until you reach the state of no thought. If you do, you will find many of the answers you seek.”

“The state of no thought is when the personal thought system finds perfect stillness, transcending time, space, and matter and finds the true nature of Mind.“

“Mind is the universal intelligence of all things,

whether in form or formless.”

The Enlightened Gardener Revisited by Sydney Banks, pages 77 – 79

The post Giving Up The Search appeared first on Three Principles Foundation.

“Doomed To Struggle?” – Amy Leo

"Why did you do that? You should have..."

"You know better than that!"

“Try this instead...”

These phrases echoed throughout school corridors, provider offices, and homes during my 5 year tenure as a social worker for children and teens in the NYC area.

Improving mental health has long fascinated me, so it was only natural that I took a position working with kids recently discharged from psychiatric hospitals after college.

I was part of a team of mental health professionals dedicated to helping keep these kids in their homes and communities.

I was assigned clients and then given a large binder chock-full with: the client's demographics, history, diagnoses, medications, problem behaviors, strengths, and a list of goals each client was to meet before being discharged from the program.

I loved this job. But one thing became clear to me.

My clients weren't getting better. Not really.

They would only experience temporary relief, at best.

In fact, over the course of 5 years, I cannot think of one client who experienced long-lasting results. Not one person shifted from living mostly in distress to living mostly in well being.

I see now, this is because the traditional approach is not aligned with how personal transformation really occurs. The way change can only occur...from the inside-out.

Every person, including those kids, has access to fresh thoughts and insights. And fresh thought allows someone to see something differently about themselves or the world around them. This shift in personal perception is at the core of all lasting, personal change.

But, there was little, if no, space for fresh thought to come through in those days.

Everyone’s minds were so busy! Sessions were spent ruminating on past behaviors...busy with the should do's and you know better's...with both client and provider busy trying to prove their point.

It was a job where stress, pressure, and heaps of effort were the cultural norm. A field that assumed that the counselors were the experts and that we could do or say something to control, fix, or change the clients.

So, I spent a lot of time trying to create the perfect goal. Or plan the perfect session. While in sessions, I was preoccupied looking for the right thing to say. Or the right question to ask. Or the right therapeutic technique to try.

This resulted in my own busy mind. A mind filled with worry, expectation, and personal pressure. And this prevented me from listening deeply most of the time. I was too busy with my own inner dialogue..."Will this finally help them?"..."Will they get offended if I say this?"..."I should try that thing I learned in from that book yesterday...What was it again?"

I see now I was more accurately, a mental illness professional back then... focusing mostly on dysfunction by managing symptoms, identifying triggers, suggesting coping skills, and doing crisis intervention.

Back then, I never really talked about mental health. Or about the inner well-being and resiliency that all people have access to.

But today, I do talk about these things. I share that a mental health diagnosis is not a permanent sentence to which people are doomed to struggle with for the rest of their lives. I have found the transition from a mental illness professional to a mental health educator delightful and surprisingly practical.

Stress, pressure, and tedious efforting have been replaced by ease, continual learning, and deep connection.

I listen deeply now. No longer clouding conversations with my personal thoughts. I accept where my client is, where I am, and that everything is ok in that moment.

Excitingly, I witness the magic that happens when a client gets a fresh thought. A fresh insight and new perspective. When a person taps into their own mental health and wisdom. I now witness real and powerful change unfold naturally and frequently.

What incredibly different feelings and results, than those that come from trying to force-feed someone the latest technique, tip, or self-help quote.

---

I invite you to experiment with this in your own life. That we all have a built-in psychological immunity. An immunity, that like the blue sky, gets covered up with the clouds of busy, habitual personal thinking. But, the blue sky hasn't gone anywhere. It is still there.

 

 

“Doomed To Struggle?” – Amy Leo

"Why did you do that? You should have..."

"You know better than that!"

“Try this instead...”

These phrases echoed throughout school corridors, provider offices, and homes during my 5 year tenure as a social worker for children and teens in the NYC area.

Improving mental health has long fascinated me, so it was only natural that I took a position working with kids recently discharged from psychiatric hospitals after college.

I was part of a team of mental health professionals dedicated to helping keep these kids in their homes and communities.

I was assigned clients and then given a large binder chock-full with: the client's demographics, history, diagnoses, medications, problem behaviors, strengths, and a list of goals each client was to meet before being discharged from the program.

I loved this job. But one thing became clear to me.

My clients weren't getting better. Not really.

They would only experience temporary relief, at best.

In fact, over the course of 5 years, I cannot think of one client who experienced long-lasting results. Not one person shifted from living mostly in distress to living mostly in well being.

I see now, this is because the traditional approach is not aligned with how personal transformation really occurs. The way change can only occur...from the inside-out.

Every person, including those kids, has access to fresh thoughts and insights. And fresh thought allows someone to see something differently about themselves or the world around them. This shift in personal perception is at the core of all lasting, personal change.

But, there was little, if no, space for fresh thought to come through in those days.

Everyone’s minds were so busy! Sessions were spent ruminating on past behaviors...busy with the should do's and you know better's...with both client and provider busy trying to prove their point.

It was a job where stress, pressure, and heaps of effort were the cultural norm. A field that assumed that the counselors were the experts and that we could do or say something to control, fix, or change the clients.

So, I spent a lot of time trying to create the perfect goal. Or plan the perfect session. While in sessions, I was preoccupied looking for the right thing to say. Or the right question to ask. Or the right therapeutic technique to try.

This resulted in my own busy mind. A mind filled with worry, expectation, and personal pressure. And this prevented me from listening deeply most of the time. I was too busy with my own inner dialogue..."Will this finally help them?"..."Will they get offended if I say this?"..."I should try that thing I learned in from that book yesterday...What was it again?"

I see now I was more accurately, a mental illness professional back then... focusing mostly on dysfunction by managing symptoms, identifying triggers, suggesting coping skills, and doing crisis intervention.

Back then, I never really talked about mental health. Or about the inner well-being and resiliency that all people have access to.

But today, I do talk about these things. I share that a mental health diagnosis is not a permanent sentence to which people are doomed to struggle with for the rest of their lives. I have found the transition from a mental illness professional to a mental health educator delightful and surprisingly practical.

Stress, pressure, and tedious efforting have been replaced by ease, continual learning, and deep connection.

I listen deeply now. No longer clouding conversations with my personal thoughts. I accept where my client is, where I am, and that everything is ok in that moment.

Excitingly, I witness the magic that happens when a client gets a fresh thought. A fresh insight and new perspective. When a person taps into their own mental health and wisdom. I now witness real and powerful change unfold naturally and frequently.

What incredibly different feelings and results, than those that come from trying to force-feed someone the latest technique, tip, or self-help quote.

---

I invite you to experiment with this in your own life. That we all have a built-in psychological immunity. An immunity, that like the blue sky, gets covered up with the clouds of busy, habitual personal thinking. But, the blue sky hasn't gone anywhere. It is still there.

 

 

“Doomed To Struggle?” – Amy Leo

"Why did you do that? You should have..."

"You know better than that!"

“Try this instead...”

These phrases echoed throughout school corridors, provider offices, and homes during my 5 year tenure as a social worker for children and teens in the NYC area.

Improving mental health has long fascinated me, so it was only natural that I took a position working with kids recently discharged from psychiatric hospitals after college.

I was part of a team of mental health professionals dedicated to helping keep these kids in their homes and communities.

I was assigned clients and then given a large binder chock-full with: the client's demographics, history, diagnoses, medications, problem behaviors, strengths, and a list of goals each client was to meet before being discharged from the program.

I loved this job. But one thing became clear to me.

My clients weren't getting better. Not really.

They would only experience temporary relief, at best.

In fact, over the course of 5 years, I cannot think of one client who experienced long-lasting results. Not one person shifted from living mostly in distress to living mostly in well being.

I see now, this is because the traditional approach is not aligned with how personal transformation really occurs. The way change can only occur...from the inside-out.

Every person, including those kids, has access to fresh thoughts and insights. And fresh thought allows someone to see something differently about themselves or the world around them. This shift in personal perception is at the core of all lasting, personal change.

But, there was little, if no, space for fresh thought to come through in those days.

Everyone’s minds were so busy! Sessions were spent ruminating on past behaviors...busy with the should do's and you know better's...with both client and provider busy trying to prove their point.

It was a job where stress, pressure, and heaps of effort were the cultural norm. A field that assumed that the counselors were the experts and that we could do or say something to control, fix, or change the clients.

So, I spent a lot of time trying to create the perfect goal. Or plan the perfect session. While in sessions, I was preoccupied looking for the right thing to say. Or the right question to ask. Or the right therapeutic technique to try.

This resulted in my own busy mind. A mind filled with worry, expectation, and personal pressure. And this prevented me from listening deeply most of the time. I was too busy with my own inner dialogue..."Will this finally help them?"..."Will they get offended if I say this?"..."I should try that thing I learned in from that book yesterday...What was it again?"

I see now I was more accurately, a mental illness professional back then... focusing mostly on dysfunction by managing symptoms, identifying triggers, suggesting coping skills, and doing crisis intervention.

Back then, I never really talked about mental health. Or about the inner well-being and resiliency that all people have access to.

But today, I do talk about these things. I share that a mental health diagnosis is not a permanent sentence to which people are doomed to struggle with for the rest of their lives. I have found the transition from a mental illness professional to a mental health educator delightful and surprisingly practical.

Stress, pressure, and tedious efforting have been replaced by ease, continual learning, and deep connection.

I listen deeply now. No longer clouding conversations with my personal thoughts. I accept where my client is, where I am, and that everything is ok in that moment.

Excitingly, I witness the magic that happens when a client gets a fresh thought. A fresh insight and new perspective. When a person taps into their own mental health and wisdom. I now witness real and powerful change unfold naturally and frequently.

What incredibly different feelings and results, than those that come from trying to force-feed someone the latest technique, tip, or self-help quote.

---

I invite you to experiment with this in your own life. That we all have a built-in psychological immunity. An immunity, that like the blue sky, gets covered up with the clouds of busy, habitual personal thinking. But, the blue sky hasn't gone anywhere. It is still there.

 

 

The Principle of Mind

Last week, I published a brief Blog and video posting about the Three Principles as discovered by Sydney Banks, the foundation of Mental Health Education as I and thousands of others practice it. This week, I offer another brief Blog and video, just on the Principle of Mind. (The Principle of Thought will be next week, and The Principle of Consciousness after that.) I hope these are helpful to sharing the profound understanding of how these Principles can change the understanding of the true human potential for peace, across the globe.

When asked why there are three Principles, Sydney Banks used to say, “Well, actually there is just Mind. But we would not know it without Thought and Consciousness. Combine those three and there is nothing more we need to see life.” To see this in depth in Sydney Banks’ own words, read The Missing Link, or any of his other books, all of which can be found at Lone Pine Press.

As much as we try to talk about Mind, there is really little we can say because our very presence on earth is after the fact of Mind. So just as we cannot ask a savant to describe how he “learned” his gift, we cannot ask ourselves to describe how we acquired the gifts that give us life.  All we can know is that we are alive, and filled with the potential that being alive in a dynamic state allows us the possibility, at any moment, to change. The Principles describe our power to change, and it all starts with Mind.

This video is also available on You Tube

The post The Principle of Mind appeared first on Three Principles Living.

When to Listen to Your Thinking—and When to Discard It

Here are two questions I’m often asked: “When should I listen to my thinking?” “When should I discard it?” The answers are: never and always. Productive choices and behaviors occur instinctually.

To illustrate, let’s say while in the midst of writing an article, I get a case of writer’s block. I then think that I need to take a break from my writing. I listen to this thought and go for a walk in the park. When I return to my desk, however, nothing has changed. My writer’s block hasn’t shifted one bit.

How can that happen?

Well, noticing thought is the first sign that I’m overthinking and not capable of making sound decisions. I should have stayed in the game and kept writing. This, I must add, is the opposite of simply getting up from my desk—without forethought—and taking a walk in the park. Such instinctual behavior can only be initiated by my inner wisdom or psychological immune system. It’s guaranteed to assist me in the clearing of my writer’s block.

Remember: Thoughts that ring in your head are meant to be discarded, not followed or listened to. Absent of coincidence (it would have been a coincidence if my writer’s block had cleared at the same time I took a walk in the park), sound decisions are noticed in hindsight. They occur instinctually—minus perceptible thought.

Who is the better therapist?

Pransky the therapy dog with Jack Pransky

Two Vermont Therapy Dogs Named Pransky

When Erika Bugbee told me Kara Stamback had told her that she saw an article about a Therapy Dog named Pransky who lives in Vermont, I had to track down this dog and get my picture taken with him.

Turns out Pransky belongs to another cousin of ours, Sue Halpern, who is in the picture with us. Pransky even has a book written about him: A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home by none other than Sue Halpern. I started the book, and it’s delightful. Pransky is one of the sweetest dogs I’ve ever met. This picture was taken by Sue’s husband, noted environmentalist, Bill McKibben. But Pransky, the dog, stole the show. I am honored to meet my namesake. Pransky is probably an even better therapist than I am. Cool, huh?

The post Who is the better therapist? appeared first on Center for Inside-Out Understanding.