What’s the big deal?

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nebula

Whenever I have a chance to browse through the NASA photographs from the Hubble Space Telescope, I am humbled and amazed at the enormity of creation.  How astonishing that we, tiny specks of being on a tiny fragment in a tiny solar system of this roiling infinitude of energy taking form and dissolving back to formlessness, are a part of it all. We are participants in the whole of creation, the whole infinite universe of creation. And what we create actually matters, at least to that little pinprick of the universe we inhabit.

It is too much for most of us to try to wrap our minds around the whole of it, but we can see our part of it, and feel the energy of life flowing through us, and recognize our own power to direct and alter the formation of form. What’s the big deal? The big deal is that the same universal energy, the “life force beyond all things that has no form, yet gives form to all things” (Sydney Banks, The Missing Link, p. 68), is our power to create experience and live it.

Whatever we create from the infinitude of possibility, we will experience. If we never see or recognize our role in creation, we will live at the mercy of random thoughts, stuck in the illusion that the “reality” outside of us is pushing us around. If we wake up to the power we have to create and recreate, we will live in the freedom to generate our own dynamic experience of whatever reality we see.

I worked with a young boy, maybe 12 years old, several years ago, who had started having nightmares that kept him from sleeping. His mother was concerned because he was telling her he couldn’t go to sleep because he was “afraid of infinity.” She didn’t want to put him on medication, but she was increasingly concerned about him. She asked me to talk with him.

The way I see it, from the standpoint of an understanding of the Principles of Mind, Consciousness and Thought, there was nothing about “infinity”, an abstract scientific concept, that could frighten him. It’s just part of the “reality” out there that the term exists and describes “no beginning and no end.” The only thing that can create fear from any reality is the thoughts we have about that reality.

So I asked the young man what he “thought” about infinity. He said it was like “falling forever and never knowing when you would hit.” In his mind, infinity was like a really tall mountain. If you fell off, you would fall and fall and fall and be more and more frightened all the way down and never know when you would reach the end of the fall.

What he thought had nothing to do with the actual meaning of infinity, which is a “reality” beyond human comprehension at any rate. What he thought was his made-up version of it, which was frightening. Infinity has no power to impose fear on us. Our thinking about it is the power that creates fear from the inside out.

So I asked him, “Do you know what scientists say to describe infinity?” He didn’t, really. He just remembered hearing about it in school. So we looked it up. Of course, there are a lot of meanings, practical, poetic, and mathematical, but the basic one is “having no boundaries.”

So, I asked, how can you “fall” in something that has no bottom, no top, no sides? How would you know you weren’t flying?”

He was silent for a bit. And then he said. “Well, it’s not really scary then, is it? You’d never get hurt in infinity because you could be moving in any direction and you wouldn’t hit anything.  I guess I just was thinking about it funny.”

His mother said his nightmares stopped and he had stopped talking about infinity after our conversation. Again, from the perspective of the Principles, he reflected in a quiet state of mind and had a new thought. The new thought was not scary, so when it came to mind, it created a feeling of comfort, rather than a feeling of fear.

The content of the thought doesn’t really matter. He was only 12 years old; there was a lot more he could learn and understand about infinity as time went on, and the new thought he had wasn’t necessarily “right” or “wrong.” It was just a less scary thought, and, since it had occurred to him and made sense to him when he thought it, it was a relief to him. What we see for ourselves makes sense to us.

That’s important. What I could teach him next is more important. I taught him that we always, always, always have the opportunity, when we find ourselves scared, or upset, or anxious, or disturbed, to quiet down, reflect and “think again.” The quieter our minds are, the more confidence we gain in our ability to think from insight and find wiser perspectives, greater clarity, new ways of seeing reality, better answers. That’s the big deal.

When our thinking is not generating ideas that lift us up and move us forward and give us a feeling we are moving confidently through life, we don’t have to change life or give in to it. Our thinking will change when we allow it to pass, quiet our minds, and await new thought. As our thoughts change, our experiences changes.

The beautiful thing about our participation in universal creation is that we are the creators of our own thoughts, and thus we shape the ever-changing creation that is our own life.


“Ignorance is Bliss” – The Truth in this Adage as Viewed from the Principles

You’re awaiting the results of a biopsy. You just got laid off from your job and are now unemployed. You just filed for bankruptcy and have no idea what the future holds.

In each of these cases you are thrust into the unknown. If you think into the unknown and try to figure out what’s going to happen, you are likely to get discouraged and upset by your thoughts. It won’t help you to 'positive think' your way into a favorable biopsy result, a great new job opportunity or some financial windfall. Such positive thinking won’t help you because, at some level, you know that you simply made up those positive thoughts, and therefore they are not as reassuring as you would like them to be. You could also construct mental scenarios from your fears and skepticism -- and we all know how you would end up feeling then.

What works for human beings is to stay truthful and admit that they simply don’t know what the future holds for them. It shouldn’t take much for us to look in that direction because, in those cases, we really don’t know what the future holds for us -- if we ever know. When we stay truthful and accept that we don't know, we are not faking it as we are with positive or negative thinking. We are aligned with truth. 

When people hang out in the unknown, their minds are clear and they connect to the moment. There is no need to tell you how well that works for human beings. 

When we view it from the perspective of The Principles, Ignorance – not knowing – really is bliss.

Personal versus Philosophical

Are you a coach, teacher, employer, friend, or parent who on occasion struggles getting your points across? Do people sometimes tune out, or react unkindly to, your message? One reason might be that you’re getting personal with those you’re trying to help. Instead, simply remain philosophical when giving advice. If you do, odds are that an affirmative feeling will develop between you and your audience.

Confused about the difference? Let’s look at examples of both.

Here’s an athletic coach getting personal with a player: “Never, ever, are you to disagree with me in front of the entire team. It kills team morale.”

Next, here’s a coach remaining philosophical with a player: “A team has a better chance of maintaining morale if players don’t disagree with coaches in front of the entire team.”

Both examples deliver the same message, yet they show a subtle but important distinction: Speaking from a philosophical perspective removes judgment. It turns the attention away from the individuals (both the player and coach) and toward the meaning behind the message.

Here’s another illustration of this principle. I received this disapproving email in response to one of my recent articles:

Dear Garret,

I absolutely love your blog. However, I have to say that your most recent article wasn’t one of your clearest, best written, or most helpful to me. Your articles are normally very forward-onable. This one didn’t quite cut the mustard. This brief email reply is as much to express my appreciation for the brilliance of your previous articles as to express my disappointment at the relative unforward-onableness of this one.

Best regards, Howard

Here, in spite of my initial, “Dude, you have to be kidding me” personal reaction was my philosophical response:

Howard,

Please let me know what you think of this idea: Relationships seem to work best when one person feels appreciation and expresses it to the other person. They don’t work best when one person feels disappointment and expresses it to the other person. Feelings come from us, never from something on the outside.

All best, Garret

Turns out that Howard was having a bad day. He emailed me back to say so, to thank me for my advice, and to apologize for, dare I say it, “getting personal.”

Remember, when our recommendations to others become about us, or we judge the behavior of the person we’re talking to, the conversation is bound to get personal. And personal thinking shrouds instincts and inner wisdom. In other words, your natural desire to help others does not exist for anyone’s personal gain (including your own). Stick to the philosophical—insightfulness will expand for the profit of everyone.

Who Knows? – Judy Sedgeman

I still chuckle when I think of the old joke about the teacher who asked her class to name the three greatest inventions of mankind. They named the wheel, the combustion engine, and then a young boy called out, "The Thermos!"

The teacher was taken aback. "The Thermos? Why?"

The boy responded, "Because, when you put hot stuff in it, it keeps it hot, and when you put cold stuff in it, it keeps it cold. It's a great invention because it KNOWS."

Hot or Cold?

In the random way thinking works, I thought of that joke during one of the times George Pransky was speaking at the recent3PGC Conference in St. Paul, Minnesota, describing how he somehow helped people after he first came to see the Principles of Mind, Consciousness and Thought, and before he really had any idea how he was going to share that new understanding with clients. He's often told his friends, "About the best I could do was tell people, 'When you're hot you're hot, and when you're not you're not!' And the funny thing is, that helped people."

Really, it makes sense that it would help people because the truth is alive within everyone, sometimes obscured but always there, and all it takes to help people is to resonate with it. People "get" simple ideas that are just plain true. Just like the thermos, we KNOW hot from cold, one from the other.

Here's another example: About 20 years, ago, my late colleague Roger Mills and I discovered we were both working in New York at the same time. We had dinner one night and made a spur of the moment decision to just get a place and bring the two groups we were working with together for a couple of days and hold a retreat. Roger was working with residents from a housing project in Brooklyn. I was working with corporate executives. We were able to get a nice space at Fordham University, and on a sunny Saturday, we welcomed our very diverse audience. When everyone got into the room together, there was, at first, a little tension, each group eyeing the other with a bit of suspicion. But Roger and I soldiered on.

Towards the end of the first morning, we were beginning to feel we weren't getting anywhere and we were starting to get into our heads over it. We gave each other the signal it was time to take a break. Just as we did that, one of the ladies from Brooklyn stood up and strode to the front of the room. "Dr. Mills," she said, "sit down! Miss Judy, you sit down, too! I want to say something." Surprised, we both sat down.

She stood at the front of the room quietly for a few seconds and then she said, "Don't be thinking so much. The fact is, sometimes you're in your right mind (she took a couple of strides to the right and stopped to look at everyone), and sometimes you're not (she took several strides to the left, and stopped to look at everyone. Then she moved over to the right again and planted her feet and said, "THIS is better!"

Everyone laughed, but everyone saw the simple truth of it, too. Common sense makes sense. Wisdom doesn't need a lot of window dressing. The group warmed up and started interacting and  the retreat went very well.

The fact is, we all know the same truth, deep down. Those who are lucky enough to have seen it clearly enough to talk about it feel compelled to try to share it because, once you see it, life is so, so, so much easier and more joyful. Your just get filled with hope that, if only everyone saw it clearly, everyone could find that for themselves. But sharing it doesn't mean putting it INto other people; they already have it. It's innate. It just means awakening their own wisdom so they see what they have -- and then they want to share it, too. And on it goes.

Who knows? We ALL know. Everyone knows. It's just a matter of seeing what we know.

All human psyches are rooted in universal truth and no person’s psyche is better than any other’s. Only to the degree of the individual’s psychological and spiritual understanding does it appear to vary.                                                                                                                                                                              - Sydney Banks, The Missing Link

 

Deep grief, Deep love


One of our beautiful golden retrievers who was suffering from cancer and could no longer move had to be put to sleep by our vet.  Our dog was such a lively dog who unconditionally loved each of us for the 12 years of her life.  Every time she would see one of us coming she would squeal with joy.

If you have ever lost a close family pet, I am sure you can appreciate the range of emotion we all felt, from love and gratitude to deep sorrow and grief.  I will never forget the image of my grandson Jacob with his face buried in his dog’s ear, racked with sobs as he gently touched her with so much gentleness and kindness.  Through my own tears I felt such love for both of them at that moment.

As a student of the 3 Principles for 27 years I have learned the beauty of allowing all thoughts and feelings to flow through me freely.  My teacher Syd Banks taught us that we don’t have to be frightened by any of our experiences.  The play of thought is constantly bringing us a wide array of feelings.  When we understand that this wide array is the play of the Principles we can appreciate this dance created by the spiritual energy of life.

No thought or feeling in and of itself can hurt us psychologically if we don’t struggle with it.  We struggle with our experience when we judge it, try and resist or stop it, try to manipulate it, or wish we weren’t having it.  It is this struggle against the already created thoughts and feelings that creates the problem.  It is this struggle that takes us out of the now and gets us entangled in the apparent reality of our thinking.  It is this struggle that blocks the arising of our next thought that will shift our feeling.  After our dog died, Jacob stopped crying, went outside to ride his bike, and then he came back to her grave in the backyard and start crying, then he was angry and demanding, then he was back happily riding his bike.  Left alone, struggle free, our wisdom keeps shifting our thinking in a healthy direction.  This is how the wisdom of our mind guides us to healing.

When we understand that all feelings are just the natural creation or play of spiritual energy manifesting, then we can let it be and allow it to shift and change on its own.  This shift happens naturally and is guided by the intelligence, or wisdom, behind life.  When grief and loss and sorrow wash through us unimpeded and without judgment we experience these feelings as the natural and beautiful flow of life.

When our understanding of the play of thought allows us to stand open and receptive in the face of any thought whether of love or grief, and it flows through us naturally, then a deeper unconditional love arises that embraces all of life as it is and it flows out of us to touch those around us.  And I know that the deep love we felt for our dog and each other was both uplifting and healing.


Our Children: Dazed and Confused

Imagine an innocent young boy. He’s inventive, open, durable, passionate, and friendly. He does well in school, art class, and athletics. Things come naturally to the boy; he has some ups and downs, but for the most part life is simple and carefree.

Yet as he grows, loved ones, teachers, and coaches start to teach him right from wrong; good from bad. They tell him who to trust, to wear a jacket when chilly, how to hold a pencil or paintbrush, that money has value, and the proper way to throw a ball. They also insist that he stand up for himself when someone makes him feel bad. And they make sure he apologizes when he makes others feel the same way.

Soon, the boy’s level of wonder and efficiency starts to decline. He becomes temperamental, blameful, and defensive. Often, his confidence appears shaken. Most of all, however, he just doesn’t seem happy.

—————

This scenario is much more common than you might think. Indeed, every young child starts with the innate capacity to live freely and contentedly, to adjust to people and situations, and to self-correct when troubled. Then at some point, and to varying degrees, they lose these inherent gifts.

Why does this happen? Children are taught something that, deep down, they know is not true. They’re taught that a situation on the outside can affect how a person feels on the inside. And as children grow and additional outside-in directives are thrown their way, they become dazed and confused. Next stop: the diagnoses of an attention-deficit (or mental) disorder and the prescription of therapy and/or medication. This only adds more excuses and information into heads that now have way too much noise. The system gets jammed.

Grownups—when is enough going to be enough? When are we going to wake up?

You were once one of these children, so look around. Are you consistently cheerful? Passionate? Productive? Do you give back to others? What about the world we live in: Why is there hate? Why is there war? The reason is that the overwhelming majority of us have it wrong: One’s feelings cannot come from another person or situation. When a person’s head is clear, he feels good; when it’s cluttered, he doesn’t. Outside circumstances have no power over us. Our feelings come from the inside.

That’s the lesson we don’t teach our children. That’s why we lose the purity of our youth, and our natural propensity for peace of mind, compassion, and generosity. That’s also why, I believe, we must stop filling our children with personal judgments and opinions about how to conquer life. We’re creating victims and jeopardizing innate resilience. We’re thwarting our children’s free will and instincts. Guidance is far different than control; love beats discipline every time. If we don’t stop cramming the heads of our kids with external analysis and advice (thinking), they’ll end up just like us.

Here’s a different idea about what we can do: Let’s start setting examples of clarity and rising above. No, you can’t control your own level of anxiety, anger, or fear when they creep in—but you can reconsider the source of these sensations. Look inside to the degree your head is filled with thought at any given moment, carry on, and allow your mind to change. All of us (me too) need to stop buying into the false perceptions and judgments that spawn from a bound-up disposition, and acting—including preaching to our kids—when we feel this way. Children intuitively grasp that they feel their thinking and nothing external. When we tell them otherwise, or lash out at the world in order to manage our self-created insecurity in their presence, we confound and bind them to the point that they, too, are not capable.

Isn’t it time to admit that the current way of thinking just doesn’t work? Isn’t it time we stopped making outward excuses for how we feel on the inside; then coping, bullying, and forcing in order to feel better? The time has finally come to grasp it and then live it: Life works one way—from the inside-out. Remember, our children are watching.

Who knows?

I still chuckle when I think of the old joke about the teacher who asked her class to name the three greatest inventions of mankind. They named the wheel, the combustion engine, and then a young boy called out, “The Thermos!”

The teacher was taken aback. “The Thermos? Why?”

The boy responded, “Because, when you put hot stuff in it, it keeps it hot, and when you put cold stuff in it, it keeps it cold. It’s a great invention because it KNOWS.”

Hot or Cold?

Hot or Cold?

In the random way thinking works, I thought of that joke during one of the times George Pransky was speaking at the recent 3PGC Conference in St. Paul, Minnesota, describing how he somehow helped people after he first came to see the Principles of Mind, Consciousness and Thought, and before he really had any idea how he was going to share that new understanding with clients. He’s often told his friends, “About the best I could do was tell people, ‘When you’re hot you’re hot, and when you’re not you’re not!’ And the funny thing is, that helped people.”

Really, it makes sense that it would help people because the truth is alive within everyone, sometimes obscured but always there, and all it takes to help people is to resonate with it. People “get” simple ideas that are just plain true. Just like the thermos, we KNOW hot from cold, one from the other.

Here’s another example: About 20 years, ago, my late colleague Roger Mills and I discovered we were both working in New York at the same time. We had dinner one night and made a spur of the moment decision to just get a place and bring the two groups we were working with together for a couple of days and hold a retreat. Roger was working with residents from a housing project in Brooklyn. I was working with corporate executives. We were able to get a nice space at Fordham University, and on a sunny Saturday, we welcomed our very diverse audience. When everyone got into the room together, there was, at first, a little tension, each group eyeing the other with a bit of suspicion. But Roger and I soldiered on.

Towards the end of the first morning, we were beginning to feel we weren’t getting anywhere and we were starting to get into our heads over it. We gave each other the signal it was time to take a break. Just as we did that, one of the ladies from Brooklyn stood up and strode to the front of the room. “Dr. Mills,” she said, “sit down! Miss Judy, you sit down, too! I want to say something.” Surprised, we both sat down.

She stood at the front of the room quietly for a few seconds and then she said, “Don’t be thinking so much. The fact is, sometimes you’re in your right mind (she took a couple of strides to the right and stopped to look at everyone), and sometimes you’re not (she took several strides to the left, and stopped to look at everyone. Then she moved over to the right again and planted her feet and said, “THIS is better!”

Everyone laughed, but everyone saw the simple truth of it, too. Common sense makes sense. Wisdom doesn’t need a lot of window dressing. The group warmed up and started interacting and  the retreat went very well.

The fact is, we all know the same truth, deep down. Those who are lucky enough to have seen it clearly enough to talk about it feel compelled to try to share it because, once you see it, life is so, so, so much easier and more joyful. Your just get filled with hope that, if only everyone saw it clearly, everyone could find that for themselves. But sharing it doesn’t mean putting it INto other people; they already have it. It’s innate. It just means awakening their own wisdom so they see what they have — and then they want to share it, too. And on it goes.

Who knows? We ALL know. Everyone knows. It’s just a matter of seeing what we know.

All human psyches are rooted in universal truth and no person’s psyche is better than any other’s. Only to the degree of the individual’s psychological and spiritual understanding does it appear to vary.                                                                                                                                                                              Sydney Banks, The Missing Link


Proving It

At least once a week, a person new to my work asks me to prove the efficacy of knowing that your feelings come from your thinking and not from your circumstances. Some potential clients, for example, want the hard facts or data that substantiates the inside-out paradigm that I teach.

Here’s the thing, though: I don’t have data, and I won’t try to prove the importance of the paradigm. I do, of course, believe that knowing that your perceptions are formed from in to out is vitally important—if you want your mind to self-correct (clear) when you feel troubled, that is.

Why do I look at it this way? Two reasons:

First, to me, the use of data, in general, is misleading and almost never shows cause and effect. In pro golf, for example, many types of mental techniques are employed by players on a regular basis. In fact, players will often remark after a good round that they were actually seeing the ball in flight (visualization) before they hit certain shots. Therefore, because mental techniques are so common, it appears to these players that a visualization technique is what helped produce the good round.

It doesn’t work that way, however.

It’s like an analogy I’ve used before: Storm drain overflow and umbrella usage almost always occur simultaneously, but one doesn’t cause the other, the rain determines both. The same goes for visualization and excellence on the golf course. Just substitute a clear head for the rain. It’s a clear head that leads to both the natural ability to see a golf shot before it happens (visualization) and excellence.

Second, and more significantly, you simply can’t measure truth. There’s no way to calculate how well a person understands the thought/feeling connection. For sure, those who seem to grasp it tend to give back and manifest change for the better, i.e., Martin Luther King Jr., Gandhi, Mother Teresa, Nelson Mandela. But proving that these outstanding leaders recognized the powerless nature of their thinking (and the powerless nature of the thinking of others) is pretty much impossible. We can only refer to their actions, and their actions, to me, appear to have come from clarity most of the time.

No, I don’t possess hard numbers to prove that what I teach—a person’s feelings come from inside of him or her and are always subject to change, while outside circumstances are powerless—is at the core of one’s resilience, contentment, and productivity level. I just know that it’s so. That knowing is good enough for me. I hope it’s good enough for you, too.

How Knowing About Three Principles Can Help Us

We are conscious beings and capable of knowing that we are conscious beings – that’s really quite amazing, isn’t it?

Group Session

Group Session

Sometimes stories that come out in a counseling session or in a group session seem to beg to be recorded. This is one of those times.

A group of us meet on alternate Tuesday nights to explore the Three Principles in our everyday lives. Participants share insights that occurred from their knowledge of the Three Principles and how that knowledge assisted them in their interactions at home, at work, and with friends and family.

Through the weeks we had heard of a group member’s recent dealings with his elderly mother who had been showing signs of dementia. I’ll call him Dave. One evening Dave received an email from his sister who had him convinced that their mother was declining faster than anyone had realized.

Concerned and hoping to share opinions on next steps, Dave called his parents. Dave’s father told him there was no reason to panic; his mother said: “Oh, you know how your sister tends to exaggerate things.” Dave confirmed that there was no diagnosis of Alzheimer’s or even dementia, according to his mother’s Dr. and test results.

Knowing what he had learned about the power of Thought from his understanding of the Three Principles, it occurred to him that people have different slants on “reality” and that they bring their personal thoughts into situations which affect that reality. Like mixing yellow paint into blue paint which then creates green paint — imbuing a situation with our personal thinking, colors the situation making it appear as factual when in fact it is just our slant on the situation.

He said, “After talking to my father I realized it was a case of ‘separate realities’ going on between them and my sister. That was when my thinking changed.”

We call that “thought recognition.” In the moments we realize our experience is coming from our own thinking, an insight often follows. Dave realized that his family members, having different thoughts about the same situation, were coming from different realities. That was when his own thinking shifted. Notice this has nothing to do with “positive thinking.” It has to do with a shift in consciousness from within himself simply by recognizing the Principles at the core of the experience.

Dave said she wasn’t herself, not the way she was before; yet he had been more relaxed about his mother’s situation over the last few days since he had some new thoughts about it:

“She is definitely having some memory problems and confusion, also hand tremors and a slower gait, but if she’s safe and following doctor’s orders and happy I see no reason to be bothered that she’s not the way she was.  Actually, she seemed more relaxed, when I saw her, not at all bothered by any of the changes we’re perceiving.” What matters is what she experiences and that she gets good care.

While visiting his parents, Dave had the opportunity to attend a family reunion with nieces and nephews he had not seen in a long time. He was struck by how well everyone got along and in his more relaxed state of mind with regard to his mother’s condition he found himself touched by the way the younger generation interacted so well with one another. He had a wonderful new thought come to mind, since he had stopped filling his head with worry thoughts. Now there was space for upbeat, caring thoughts to come through and Dave realized that the younger generation would carry on beautifully as the older generation departed.

Another insight took place at work.  Dave had some difficulties with a co-worker he felt didn’t tow the line and carry her weight on the job. Then he was put in the position of having to be trained by her, on a new system. He saw firsthand just how incorrect our initial perceptions can be. He realized that not only does she accomplish an amazing amount of tasks during the workday when he had had the impression that she was a dead weight;  a neerdowell, he saw while being trained that she is a supreme multi-tasker. She was able to talk to coworkers while she faxed, copied and filed, all while interacting pleasantly, helping co-workers laugh and relax. He realized immediately, given his understanding of the Three Principles, that it was all an illusion on his part. His image of her was coming from his own thinking – it was not based in reality; yet it appeared to be real, given his personal perception (Thought plus Consciousness = perceived reality) of her…. what an eye opener that was! He and others in the group realized this experience/insight informed other aspects of life as well.

Dave then recalled that several years ago when he had been thinking that his previous boss liked his co-workers better than him because they were fun and he was boring. “My thinking at the time was that my co workers joked around too much…with practical jokes and throwing little things at each other and socializing a lot at work. It probably affected my relationship with the coworkers because I’m guessing that I came off as aloof or annoyed with them.”

“As I began to recognize the Principles in action more, I realized that the boss might have wished they could be more like me. I think that was one of the first times the Three Principles really clicked with me because I realized that the other thought was equally as likely as what I had initially ‘made up’ and the truth was that I really didn’t know what my boss was thinking about the situation or if he even was comparing us at all.”

“It’s truly been remarkable how my understanding of the Three Principles has unexpectedly helped in ways I never would have suspected, such as having more compassion for others as well as myself.”

We have found these sessions to be really helpful for all of us. We learn from one another’s insights, creating a ripple effect; one insight seems to illicit another. If you would like to join our group, please contact me at: Lori@3Principlestherapy.com or 860-561-1919.

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