Exploring the True Nature of Internal Resilience: A View from the Inside-Out

This is to announce that a new three principles article (actually, a chapter) appears in the Sixth Edition of the book, The Strengths Perspective in Social Work Practice, edited by Dennis Saleeby. Authored by Drs. Diane McMillen of Washburn University and Jack Pransky, chapter 13 is titled, "Exploring the True Nature of Internal Resilience: A View from the Inside-Out." This is a very well-respected and widely read book in the social work field and we are honored to be part of it and have the opportunity to spread the word about the power of the three principles, especially in a field that makes a huge difference in people's lives.

Here is an excerpt:

 

"...consider this: Might the outside-in, strengths-building approach also inadvertently carry with it the subtle message that people lack something that they need to gain from outside themselves? For example, if we assume people need life skills to make it in the world, are we also saying, subtly, that they presently lack something that we need to give them to succeed?  Or, if a child grows up in an unhealthy environment, are we saying, subtly, that they won’t make it unless that environment improves or they find a supportive mentor who can guide them? At the very least this is food for thought...

            "Looking at strengths from the inside-out offers a very different perspective. Here we begin with the premise, or knowing, that everyone at their core, at their essence, within their soul, is pure “health,” pure love, has pure peace of mind and pure wisdom. In other words, at their essence people already are everything they are looking for. Everyone has the strength or natural capacity innately, built into the very fabric of their being, to rise above unhealthy circumstances and transcend their problems.

"If true, why do so many people walk around looking like they don’t have this state of “health?” What if the only reason is because they use their own thinking, inadvertently, to obscure this essence, to cover it up, so it appears hidden (Pransky, 2003)?

"How do we know this? Because when people’s minds calm down or their heads clear their mental health and wisdom is revealed. All we have to do is ask ourselves where we are or what we’re doing when we get our best ideas, and invariably we find it is when we are doing something where our mind relaxes. In other words, our essence is always present within us, but it becomes hidden when our own thinking obscures it. Yet, when our typical thinking loosens its grip, this natural capacity for health and well-being, with all its built-in traits, automatically and naturally rises to the surface, because it never went anywhere in the first place!...

 "We assert that what people already have inside them is their greatest strength. People are capable of realizing this and seeing what gets in its way. To see people this way offers automatic hope for all. When people gain this understanding they become free from the prison of their own minds and their well-being and wisdom are unveiled and begin to guide them through life. With this realization an individual’s strength becomes illuminated and seems to magnify. It begins to affect others around him or her. It ripples out to affect family and friends, then ripples further to affect organizations and communities. Hence, change happens from the inside-out. When practitioners in the fields of social work, human services, prevention and resiliency come to understand what it truly means to see and work from the inside-out, limitless potential arises. The possibilities for individual, community and societal change rise to a higher level…"

 

The citing is:

 

Pransky, J. & McMillen, D.P. (2013). "Exploring the true nature of internal resilience: A view from the inside-out" in Saleeby, D. [Ed.].The strengths perspective in social work practice, sixth edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. (235-254).

A further note: I also just received the proof for an article by Dr. Tom Kelley and myself accepted for publication in the Journal for Traumatic Stress Disorders and Treatment, titled, "Principles for Realizing Resilience: A New View of Trauma and Inner Resilience." Special thanks to Kathy Marshall for her important suggestions. I will keep 3PGC posted when it officially becomes published.

Thank you,

Jack

New Three Principles Chapter in Well-Respected Book

A new three principles article (actually, a chapter) appears in the Sixth Edition of the book, The Strengths Perspective in Social Work Practice, edited by Dennis Saleeby. Authored by Drs. Diane McMillen of Washburn University and Jack Pransky, chapter 13 is titled, “Exploring the True Nature of Internal Resilience: A View from the Inside-Out.” This is a very well-respected and widely read book in the social work field and we are honored to be part of it and have the opportunity to spread the word about the power of the three principles, especially in a field that makes a huge difference in people’s lives.
Here is an excerpt:

“…consider this: Might the outside-in, strengths-building approach also inadvertently carry with it the subtle message that people lack something that they need to gain from outside themselves? For example, if we assume people need life skills to make it in the world, are we also saying, subtly, that they presently lack something that we need to give them to succeed?  Or, if a child grows up in an unhealthy environment, are we saying, subtly, that they won’t make it unless that environment improves or they find a supportive mentor who can guide them? At the very least this is food for thought…

“Looking at strengths from the inside-out offers a very different perspective. Here we begin with the premise, or knowing, that everyone at their core, at their essence, within their soul, is pure “health,” pure love, has pure peace of mind and pure wisdom. In other words, at their essence people already are everything they are looking for. Everyone has the strength or natural capacity innately, built into the very fabric of their being, to rise above unhealthy circumstances and transcend their problems.

“If true, why do so many people walk around looking like they don’t have this state of “health?” What if the only reason is because they use their own thinking, inadvertently, to obscure this essence, to cover it up, so it appears hidden (Pransky, 2003)?

“How do we know this? Because when people’s minds calm down or their heads clear their mental health and wisdom is revealed. All we have to do is ask ourselves where we are or what we’re doing when we get our best ideas, and invariably we find it is when we are doing something where our mind relaxes. In other words, our essence is always present within us, but it becomes hidden when our own thinking obscures it. Yet, when our typical thinking loosens its grip, this natural capacity for health and well-being, with all its built-in traits, automatically and naturally rises to the surface, because it never went anywhere in the first place!…

“We assert that what people already have inside them is their greatest strength. People are capable of realizing this and seeing what gets in its way. To see people this way offers automatic hope for all. When people gain this understanding they become free from the prison of their own minds and their well-being and wisdom are unveiled and begin to guide them through life. With this realization an individual’s strength becomes illuminated and seems to magnify. It begins to affect others around him or her. It ripples out to affect family and friends, then ripples further to affect organizations and communities. Hence, change happens from the inside-out. When practitioners in the fields of social work, human services, prevention and resiliency come to understand what it truly means to see and work from the inside-out, limitless potential arises. The possibilities for individual, community and societal change rise to a higher level…”

The citing is:
Pransky, J. & McMillen, D.P. (2013). “Exploring the true nature of internal resilience: A view from the inside-out” in Saleeby, D. [Ed.].The strengths perspective in social work practice, sixth edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. (235-254).
A further note: I also just received the proof for an article by Dr. Tom Kelley and myself accepted for publication in the Journal for Traumatic Stress Disorders and Treatment, titled, “Principles for Realizing Resilience: A New View of Trauma and Inner Resilience.” Special thanks to Kathy Marshall for her important suggestions. I will keep you posted when it officially becomes published.

The post New Three Principles Chapter in Well-Respected Book appeared first on Center for Inside-Out Understanding.

Enough said

One of the effects of quick and easy electronic communication is that anyone can say anything to thousands, if not tens of thousands, of people with a few quick clicks and a press of the “send” button, without even a moment’s pause. We’ve lost the value of allowing time and space for reflection to frame and produce our comments.

Who asks themselves these questions any more: Do I need to say this? Is this valuable? Is this the best way to say it? Is this what I really want to say? Is this clear and concise? Could this inadvertently bring hurt or harm to someone else? Is this true? Does anyone even care about this? Sometimes it feels like the whole world of interpersonal communications is set to either “knee-jerk” or  “stream of consciousness”  — unedited, unconsidered, unending.

Long before the advent of the internet, when we still wrote our first drafts in longhand and pecked out the final manuscript on a manual typewriter, when we still developed readable penmanship to write and mail letters to friends and family, I was trained as an English major to care deeply about the written and spoken word. Then I was trained as a journalist to know that any sentence that is incorrect or easily misconstrued could destroy my credibility or lead to lawsuit.  So I have always had a predisposition to exercise some care about my words.

Even so, looking back to my life before and after I came to understand the way the human mind works to create reality, I can see a huge change in the frequency, intensity and quality of my communications. Having learned to reflect, I find I have less and less need to say a lot, and I care more and more about what I do say. I find that a sudden urge to write or say a lot, in detail, with fervor, about anything feels symptomatic, rather than important, to me (not that I never do it anyway). By “symptomatic” I mean it lets me know my mind is racing, and I’m losing the capacity to reflect and speak from insight and wisdom, not from habit and reaction. It’s certainly not that I’m especially insightful or wise. We’re all the same. Everyone, abbubblessolutely everyone, on the planet has access to insights and wisdom beyond their habitual thinking. We don’t always take advantage of that access; some people have lost touch with it. But it’s there for us all, always.

We recognize that access by the feeling of a quiet mind. A mind at ease generates responsive ideas that are right for the moment, and nothing more. A mind at ease produces a graceful flow of ideas with plenty of space between, reflective space to allow fresh thoughts to form, like bubbles rising to the surface. A mind at ease listens without thought, taking in what others are saying and allowing it to have its own impact, without rushing to produce an answer. A mind at ease allows small thoughts to pass, unwritten and unsaid, while larger thoughts are rising. A mind at ease is comfortable in silence and clear in communication.

What generates a quiet mind and appreciation for it? We don’t have to do or fix anything to find our own quietude. It is our natural state. We just look to live in a quiet state of mind, to enjoy our lives as they unfold, simply realizing that original, constructive, creative thoughts are the natural gift that is our birthright to thrive and survive. Insight, wisdom and common sense come through us readily when we allow our minds to work in harmony with life, knowing that ideas will arise and create our experience of reality. Once a reality appears, it is. As thoughts flow, each passes, and something else is. A quiet mind does not entertain extraneous thought about the dynamic course of reality. It is.

Enough said.


"The Essence of Well-Being"


We all fall asleep.
We all fall in love.
We all fall out of our incessant mind chatter at times,
   and it leaves us undistracted and present to life.
This is ordinary and experienced by all.
We fall into a quiet space, always there beneath the chatter,
   yet we rarely realize the power and magnitude of this space.
For centuries mystics have called this inner space, Consciousness.
Look within.
We can all sense and intuit this space.
It is the very essence of the sense “I exist”.
It is the deepest sense of just being.
It has endless depth.
When our personal thinking falls quiet and still,
   we can sense this Silence, this I Am.
This is the always-present backdrop to our experience.
Some call it the eternal Witness, or Awareness.
Some call it Presence…our presence…God’s Presence within us.
Some call this our Soul…our True Self…Home.
The deeper we realize the truth and fact of this always-present,
   fundamental Principle, the more we are drawn to it as if it is a
   powerful magnetic force.
Little self merges into big Self.
A river merges into the ocean…the Ocean of Consciousness.
The greatest Mystery of life is that out of this Great Nothingness
   all of life is created.
Fall into this vast Openness and
   we are enlivened,
   renewed,
   surprised,
   healed,
   uplifted.
Touch this space and our consciousness rises.
It must.
We will see anew with more and more love and understanding.
We wake up from the dark, limiting reality of our egoic thinking,
   and we discover a new world of love and understanding.
We fall awake.
We fall into Love.
We fall into the Heart of the Universe and discover it is our heart.


This Principle of Consciousness, the essence of well-being, is the domain that my dear friend and colleague Ami Chen Mills-Naim and I will continue to explore with all who wish to join us in either of the following events;
--Ami’s Conact Talk Radio show, “The Essence of Well-Being”, Friday March 22 at 10:00am PST:  http://ctrnetwork.com/profile/AmiChen
--Our Muir Beach, CA Retreat, “Simple Principles for Spiritual Living”, Friday April 26-Sunday 28, 2013:
http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=4f8vsadab&oeidk=a07e6wt8vtbc9a21175&oseq=