The Myth of Self Development

How many times a week do we hear people saying that they need to work on some aspect of themselves; fix something; make something better; grow as a person?

 

In the context of developing new skills, such as a new language, learning a certain aspect of history, or choosing a new career path that requires adaptability, these all make sense in developing our understanding of the world.

 

However, when it comes down to us thinking that we need to become a better person, as apposed to developing news skills, we come unstuck. Subsequently we can end up spending a lot of time and sometimes a lot of money in the pursuit of this ‘better person’ we hope to become.

 

What is interesting to note is that most people usually feel they could be a better person, not because it is a natural desire, but because someone else suggested to them, at some point in their lives that they weren’t good enough just the way they were. Often leaving them with an unconscious feeling of inadequacy, born of the repeated thought that they are not good enough and need to be better in some way. Hence, the constant drama of continually needing to work on oneself without any real defined goals or plans other than: “If I keep practicing this”, or “if I just get over that”, then I will be a better person than I have been.

 

A lot of life can be wasted in this chasing the rainbow of becoming something more. The irony of this pursuit is that all human beings are born with the innate capacity for goodness and a limitless potential for psychological well-being. In other words, we all have a healthy core inside of us, to which we can return at any point in our lives, and it is from this healthy core that the best life is lived.

 

When we truly start to see that beneath the surface of our everyday thinking, the conditioned thoughts that we innocently inherited are not who we really are. We are so much more than the sum total of our lives so far. We have innocently become victims of our personal thinking – in other words, what we think in any given moment becomes the reality that we experience, and some of those thoughts have been around for so long we no longer even notice that they are part of our everyday thinking. They simply run beneath the surface of our conscious awareness.

 

However, if we start to see that it is all thought, we stop taking our conditioned thinking so seriously, and stop taking other peoples words (thoughts) so personally. This creates a great deal of relief for us when we see the power of Thought, and how this power is continually generating thoughts in our mind. It helps us to see the transient nature of our experience that one thought follows on from another in continual succession, and there really isn’t anything we can do to stop this process or change it, but we can know that it will not last. States of mind arise in accordance with our thinking, and shift as quickly as our thinking does.

 

This tells us something extremely important about the experience of our lives; that each moment is governed by the content of our thinking in that moment. If it is an experience we are not enjoying we can be certain that it will end. If it is an experience we love, we hardly give it a second thought and simply enjoy the moment. What is interesting about this example of our experience is that it points towards the fact that all experience is coming from the same source, i.e., the power of Thought itself, and is therefore neutral. Not ‘good’ or ‘bad’.

 

Thus, self development in anything other than acquiring new skills, is an innocently created myth, which is essentially a red herring and a never ending rabbit hole through which we fall. The answer to living a beautiful life lies in relaxing away from our conditioned thinking and relearning to trust our own wisdom and common sense, which will always guide us, if we but listen to the quiet still voice within. 


The Three Principles: A Lifestyle? – Sandy Krot

A dear friend of mine, who has been sharing The Three Principles with the world since the late 1970’s, once taught me what a principle was – in scientific terms.  Since he graduated from Cal Tech with a degree in Applied Chemistry, I felt he had some credibility in this area.  My friend said that there were three criteria for something to be considered a principle.  A principle must be explanatory, predictive, and always true.  The Three Principles as discovered by Sydney Banks certainly meet all these criteria. 

Mind, Consciousness and Thought explain the source of our mental life and predict its consequences. The Principles predict how each of us acknowledges and responds to existence.  Mind is the energy of all things whether in form or formless.  Thought is always creating mental activity from within.  Consciousness is always allowing us to live in the feeling of our thinking.

To have scientific principles in the realm of human consciousness is game-changing. Unfortunately, because of innocent misunderstanding, I think their value is diminished.  The Three Principles are frequently turned into a way to be, a lifestyle, a strategy for living or a professional approach.  I hear people say things like: “I wasn’t living by The Principles today”;  or “I live and work from The Three Principles”; or “I use The Three Principles in my work"; or “this is a story that illustrates The Three Principles".  When you consider the scientific nature of The Principles, you start to wonder how one could not be living or working by The Principles?  Isn’t every story an illustration of The Three Principles?  Aren’t Mind, Consciousness and Thought principles like gravity?  Do we say: "I am living and working by gravity today"?

One source of confusion is the definition of a principle.  It is common for people to talk about principles as rules to live by.  The Three Principles are of a different order.  Mind, Consciousness and Thought are scientific principles.  The purpose of The Three Principles is to explain life – all life, all existence -- not to prescribe how it should be lived.

Another source of confusion may be the phenomenon that when people have insights into The Principles, they seem to change for the better.  They find more ease, more mental clarity. These people laugh a lot, they are more loving and more optimistic.  That perpetuates the idea that if you “live by The Principles” you will be more positive and that The Principles appear prescriptive in a positive way.  If you go back to the scientific definition of a principle you will see that The Three Principles are simply descriptive of our experience.  As people gain understanding into The Principles their spirits may rise.  Are they living by The Principles?  Yes, but so are unhappy people and mean people and pessimists.  I have been dedicated to understanding The Principles for decades and I am at times unhappy, mean, and pessimistic. The Principles explain this.

The reason I felt moved to write this post is that The Three Principles Sydney Banks discovered are so much more than a “way to live.”  Talking about them in this way relegates them to the category of good ideas.  The world is full of good ideas.  Good ideas are not principles.  It is true that the ideas that come from people as they understand The Principles are REALLY good ideas and provide much relief for people’s suffering.  If we stop there, however, we miss out on an opportunity to explore the essential nature of life. 

The Three Principles represent one of the greatest discoveries in history.  How very fortunate we are to be a part of a true scientific awakening. 

Three Universal Principles Explain the Thinking Process – Dr. Judy Sedgeman

Three universal principles explain the thinking process: Mind, Consciousness and Thought.  Simply put, Mind is the energy of life -- the fact that we are alive. Thought is our ability to create forms or ideas from that energy. Consciousness is our ability to experience what we think as real. In other words, we are born thinking.  We think our way through life.  We see life through our thoughts as we go.  And the quality of our thinking -- how we see things moment-to-moment -- determines the quality of our lives. 

Awakening to those Three Principles sets people free from attachment to the contents of any particular thinking with the knowledge that thoughts naturally come and go. It frees people to see their state of mind, their felt response to perceived reality, as an indicator of the moment-to-moment quality of their thinking. A stressed or negative feeling state or state of mind produces a low mood and increasing tension, a feeling of insecurity, or dis-ease. That feeling warns us to allow our thinking to quiet. As people learn to trust their state of mind as a guide through life, they catch themselves earlier and earlier in the process of insecure thinking that can lead to chronic stressful states of mind and worse. Recognizing the signal to quiet down, people can leave negative thoughts alone and allow them to pass. As our minds quiet, our feeling changes and our perceived reality changes. We naturally regain our ability to address life circumstances and challenges from a wiser, more optimistic and hopeful perspective.

Once people recognize that innate health is constant and always accessible, they are able to navigate the ups and downs of their thinking without frightening themselves with their most negative thinking or deceiving themselves with their most positive thinking. We are able to be grateful in moments of exhilaration and graceful in moments of distress, and to experience the rich landscape of all our thinking as the gift of life. 

The Three Principles and Business Success – Dick Bozoian

I worked in corporate America for almost 30 years.  During this time I stayed in one place but I experienced a number of “regime changes”. I watched as huge corporations bought and sold the company that I originally joined – which did about $1B in annual sales – several times.  The corporation grew bigger and bigger as a result of this process. At the time I left annual sales for the entire organization exceeded $40B annually.  We were a good high-tech company doing extremely high tech things.

I had introduced The Three Principles of Mind, Consciousness and Thought to the company and it had caught on big.  We were offering all types of Principle-based training and seminars to executive teams and working groups and we had a good executive mentoring and coaching program.

One day the new CEO of my part of the organization called me into his office to discuss our training program.  I asked the primary Principle-base practitioner who I had retained to work with us to join me.  The CEO asked us why his company was spending so much time and money on teaching these principles.  After a while he looked at us and said: "If you can tell me why such smart, dedicated, caring people do so many stupid things, I will support you completely".  The practitioner and I looked at each other knowing that we had been given a "slow pitch down the middle of the plate", so to speak.  We told the CEO that when people get anxious, worried, angry, depressed, etc., they automatically lose their wisdom and common sense -- together with at least half of their IQ.  In this state we all do stupid, crazy things.   

A recent study I read stated that most companies lose, in profit, about 25 to 30 percent of their annual sales due to what is called “the cost of poor quality” or COPQ.  COPQ comes directly from smart, caring, dedicated people doing stupid things.  I told this to the CEO and explained how individuals and teams prosper when their state of mind is healthy.  It was really just good old common sense that unfortunately isn’t all that common.  The CEO caught on and we were allowed to continue our work.  In the end the company benefited enormously from the leaders and employees learning about The Principles.

Any and every company can hire highly intelligent workers and develop and implement highly effective practices, policies, procedures and processes.  The only real competitive advantage left is the mindset of the company's leaders and its workforce. Organizations that see this and introduce The Principles of Mind, Consciousness and Thought into their cultures will be the only ones ensured of continued success.

The Principle of Thought and Athletics – Garret Kramer

The missing link between the circumstances of an athlete’s life and his successful performances on the field can be found in the athlete’s thoughts. Those athletes who grasp that 100 percent of their sensory experiences are created via their own thinking will consistently thrive. Those athletes who attribute their sensory experiences to the world around them—their coach, teammates, opposing team, fans, contract, or home life—won’t.

Now I realize this might seem like a broad and even peculiar statement. But, just for the moment, be open to what I’m about to say: All human beings form their perceptions from the inside out. Our thoughts generate our feelings; our feelings generate our moods. If people don’t realize that this dynamic is always at work, they will have little choice but to attribute their emotions to their current circumstances. As an illustration, if a pro hockey player dislikes his coach, it will often appear that he has only two alternatives: request a trade or suffer. And why not? To him, it must be the coach who is thwarting his ability to perform. But the moment the player recognizes that his discontent is created via his own thinking, and not because of his coach’s actions, options for his future abound.

My message is that it is essential for an athlete to recognize the arbitrary nature of his own thoughts. I’m certain that upon quiet reflection our hockey player will see that he doesn’t always resent his coach. When his quality of thinking and mood is low, his perception of the world around him, including his coach, will suffer. Yet when his quality of thinking and mood rises, while he still might not agree with his coach’s decisions, he will appreciate the coach’s perspective nevertheless.

For athletes and performers in general, this is an empowering understanding. Knowing that their thoughts establish their outlook prevents them from playing victim to any outside force. The golfer who understands the principle of thought, and its connection to feelings and moods, for instance, knows better than to try to fix a thought about hitting the ball into a water hazard. It is the thought that produces the errant feeling—not the hazard itself. So when the low thought occurs (using the feeling as his guide), the golfer instinctually turns his attention toward something else—like the center of the fairway—as opposed to waging war with his current mind-set.

The bottom line is that the answer to any performance issue can be traced back to this understanding: Since a person’s thoughts, not circumstances, are what create his reality, the cure to a wayward performance will only be uncovered from within the athlete himself. And the cool thing is: left alone, the human mind will always self-correct toward clarity, compassion, resiliency, and competiveness—with no trying at all.

Understanding The Principle of thought is what allows this to fluently occur.

Taming The Hurricanes That Run Through Our Mind – Lori Carpenos

Hurricane Sandy recently ravaged the east coast of the US and devastated parts of New York and New Jersey. Last year, Hurricane Irene hit New England, where I live, very hard.  The impacts of both of these storms were really something. Power outages, fallen limbs and trees, wrecked autos, downed wires and all the devastation that can cause.

Try not taking a shower for 5 days sometime - even 3 would be a stretch for most of us. Try not having refrigerator service or air conditioning in August.  Try not having any heat on the Jersey shore in November. Try not having electric lights and not being able to flush your toilet. Now multiply that by 3 since most of these people had their children's needs to tend to as well.

I found myself reflecting about the physical devastation that can happen in an instant. It occurred to me that it is the same force, the same energy that blows through us, continually, in our own individual minds. The energy that powers weather is the same energy powering the constant movement of our lungs, the same energy causing our heart to beat. This force of energy has been called, the breath of life, the life force; it is known as Ruach in the Hebrew language. In a flash (pun intended) I saw our emotional upsets as a microcosm of hurricanes.

Thoughts form, at times they pick up speed and swirl though our minds causing upset, even devastation at times. Eventually the whirlwind of thoughts calm down and we bounce back with great resiliency, perhaps even forgetting what caused the extreme dither. There might be people we rankled in our path, however. They may not be as resilient because now they are left with their own whirlwind of thought attempting to make sense out of what just happened.

Knowing something about how thought works to create our human experiences, thanks to Sydney Banks's discovery of The Three Principles that so adequately explain what powers the human experience, I've seen the value in finding out how to be more aware of impending hurricanes of the mind. We can feel it gathering momentum if we quiet down long enough to pay attention. That is the alert signal for us, like a foghorn in the distance warning the community of some impending danger. Batten down the hatches, usher your children to the safety of a basement or a friend's safe haven. We stand to learn from nature, as she provides physical lessons we can apply to our inner, personal world. We can batten down the hatch of our mouthpiece, knowing that in an upset, swirling state of mind, we will only create more upset by thinking it a second time. If we ignore the signal and speak what is on the top of our mind we'll unnecessarily leave behind damage in our wake. We can provide safety for our loved ones by telling them gently that we are out of sorts, bad mood looming and we need to take some space until the bad mood passes. People understand this because we all experience bad moods from time to time. By looking more closely at the nature of thought, vis-à-vis Mr. Banks’ discovery, we see that common sense resides at our core, and we can depend upon it, even in our most difficult moments if we quiet our thinking long enough to pay attention to common sense. It's very still and quiet however, and it's way down deep inside of us (so to speak) so it takes a very quiet mind to access it. That is where we recognize the people around us are our friends, they are not our enemies; there is a peaceful state of mind that resides within us if we take the time to access it.

Interestingly, the ancient Hebrew word ruach generally means wind, breath, mind, spirit, "the spirit, whose essence is divine." In a living creature, ruach means breath.

How to keep up with technology and not lose your mind in the process…

PicturePhoto by Bill Canfield



The world seems to be changing at warp speed, to me; does it to you, too? I wonder when I turned into my mother.



​​
Hunkered down at home on a Monday due to storm cancellations, I thought it a good time to take care of the personal business that I put off as long as possible — checking credit card statements, emails, movie reviews, and frequent flier mile questions. Things that have no urgency or deadline attached yet have the power to drive a person crazy when tackled in between two things that do have a deadline or urgency, real or imagined.

Is it really the thing that has that power?

Or is it our ability to think, that has the power? In fact, our ability to think has to be powered by the same life force that powers our heart and lungs. Our ability to think is accompanied by the free will to think anything! I learned this from Sydney Banks, who, in 1973, discovered that we all operate from three Principles: Divine Mind, Thought and Consciousness, which taken together give us an experience of our lives every second we are alive. Divine Mind refers to the power behind everything including the human ability to think. Consciousness refers to the fact that we are always conscious of what we think, it makes what we think appear as though it is the one reality. Thought refers to the ability to think anything. From this knowledge came my awareness that I could think about (reflect on) whatever I choose and I don’t have to believe any of it since I’m the one making it up.
I exercised this ability and decided to settle in and enjoy the process of taking care of the mundane things we all have to keep on top of in life.

I made my way down the list, letting out a sigh of relief with each check mark as though I had just won an Olympian award for most organized or best checker offer. Accomplishment can be such a thrill. I’m happy to have made up that game with myself, it elevates the mundane to a higher power. Why not? It feels better to do things that way and makes the mundane more pleasant.

It seems to me that we’ve been given the ability to be selfish (which is nothing more than thinking selfish thoughts and believing them, or not) — why not put that ability to good use? I used to think it was selfish to look for ways to take care of myself. I would have put finding a calm state of mind in that category thinking that the only person it would benefit would be me and then I’d get less done. Or so I thought.

First, It’s better for everyone involved when we look at things from the vantage point of a calm mind. Did it have to take a storm to see that? Not only does it not take time to be calm, it’s also good for everyone with whom I come into contact!


Let’s have a closer look…

Since when does being calm take time?

That sounds so funny to me now — I realized that it’s something I thought that I was unaware of thinking. It’s because of the Principles at play within us, that made it look real to me. I actually believed that I needed time to calm my mind — now that’s quite an idea to entertain. I reflected on the consequences of believing in such drivel.

When having to deal with customer support, I would get a thought about how annoying that’s going to be so I’d put it off, like I would if I were a kid having to clean her room or brush her teeth. Why do I think it has to be a bad experience?

All the things I put off until I THINK I’ll have time for them!

I realized that I made that up. It doesn’t have to be that way! By putting things off, the pile would only get higher and then I’d have a bunch of anxious thoughts about what needed to get done that I wasn’t doing. I would never consider if my state of mind was calm and if not, just go to a calm mind, and pick up the phone. In a calm mind, it was easy to make the choice to enjoy my time with customer service. Why not?

This insight came to me as I hung up the phone with an AT&T technician in Kentucky, named Samantha.We had a lovely time joking about how we all need a college degree in “Satellite Internet/TV remotely controlled interchange/exchange,” and a minor in cyber phonics —  we laughed; the whole thing was a pleasant exchange.

New technology can connect phone lines to TV and probably other mobile devices as well. I enjoyed moving through all the internet windows, with Samantha’s guidance, to find the page that showed me my incoming calls because the number I thought I heard on my voice mail was not a working number.

Since you can’t leave breadcrumbs on the internet, I had no idea how I would ever be able to retrace those steps without an AT&T technician on the other end of a phone line. I couldn’t help but wonder how long it took Samantha to learn all that.

I complimented her on her skills to which she told me a story about an ER Surgeon who was similarly amazed that he could do what he does by day and be completely stumped at night by a TV and a remote controller.

I commented that we all need one another and as our society becomes ever more complicated, we need one another even more. There is no individual human brain that can do it all. Even Einstein would probably need some technical assistance in today’s world.
Complicated societies require the expertise of many people. New jobs will have to be created for all the new details of modern day life. That remark seemed like a no-brain er to Samantha and me, yet a roomful of politicians may not draw the same conclusion. I wish I had asked her how long it took to learn her job and what her salary was and what her age was, but that would not be socially acceptable — or would it? In future generations perhaps it will. I chose to stick with my conditioned viewpoint that those questions would not be socially acceptable and I didn’t want Samantha to think I was prying.

She also led me through a series of steps that began at the Start button, cascaded to Control Panel and then to Internet Networking — behind that door lays the answer to the question: How many bars do you have? I know I’m being a bit glib right now since most people are quite familiar with this and in fact if I keep going you’ll know my age — or at least within 5 years of my age. I know a little but not nearly enough to keep up with the pace of technology today.

A friend warned me a couple of years ago, saying, “you’d better keep up with technology or you’ll be a dinosaur like the older CEO’s who refuse to learn as though they are better than that, and are meanwhile being replaced by their younger, tech savvy, employees.” The world has changed at warp speed; we can fight it, grin and bare it, or embrace it — the choice is ours to make. We have the free will to think anything we want.

We joked about how we can be on hold for 1/2 an hour and once someone actually picks up we’re then led through a maze, trying to figure out how to word the question, never mind figure out what the answer means.

Samantha told a story about an 80-year-old woman she tried to guide through a series of steps and the degree of patience it required because the woman could barely get beyond turning the thing to the ON position. Heavens, where will the world be when I turn 80? I had better keep up, or at the very least stay friendly with the Samantha’s of the world — they rule!

I wrote down Sam’s info so I could give her a good review for her calm effort with me.
Samantha  SL486N

How to keep up with technology and not lose your mind in the process…

The world seems to be changing at warp speed, to me; does it to you, too? I wonder when I turned into my mother.

Photo by Bill Canfield

Hunkered down at home on a Monday due to storm cancellations, I thought it a good time to take care of the personal business that I put off as long as possible — checking credit card statements, emails, movie reviews, and frequent flier mile questions. Things that have no urgency or deadline attached yet have the power to drive a person crazy when tackled in between two things that do have a deadline or urgency, real or imagined.

Is it really the thing that has that power?

Or is it our ability to think, that has the power? In fact, our ability to think has to be powered by the same life force that powers our heart and lungs. Our ability to think is accompanied by the free will to think anything! I learned this from Sydney Banks, who, in 1973, discovered that we all operate from three Principles: Divine Mind, Thought and Consciousness, which taken together give us an experience of our lives every second we are alive. Divine Mind refers to the power behind everything including the human ability to think. Consciousness refers to the fact that we are always conscious of what we think, it makes what we think appear as though it is the one reality. Thought refers to the ability to think anything. From this knowledge came my awareness that I could think about (reflect on) whatever I choose and I don’t have to believe any of it since I’m the one making it up.

I exercised this ability and decided to settle in and enjoy the process of taking care of the mundane things we all have to keep on top of in life.
I made my way down the list, letting out a sigh of relief with each check mark as though I had just won an Olympian award for most organized or best checker offer. Accomplishment can be such a thrill. I’m happy to have made up that game with myself, it elevates the mundane to a higher power. Why not? It feels better to do things that way and makes the mundane more pleasant.

It seems to me that we’ve been given the ability to be selfish (which is nothing more than thinking selfish thoughts and believing them, or not) — why not put that ability to good use? I used to think it was selfish to look for ways to take care of myself. I would have put finding a calm state of mind in that category thinking that the only person it would benefit would be me and then I’d get less done. Or so I thought.

First, It’s better for everyone involved when we look at things from the vantage point of a calm mind. Did it have to take a storm to see that? Not only does it not take time to be calm, it’s also good for everyone with whom I come into contact!

Let’s have a closer look…

Since when does being calm take time?

That sounds so funny to me now — I realized that it’s something I thought that I was unaware of thinking. It’s because of the Principles at play within us, that made it look real to me. I actually believed that I needed time to calm my mind — now that’s quite an idea to entertain. I reflected on the consequences of believing in such drivel.

When having to deal with customer support, I would get a thought about how annoying that’s going to be so I’d put it off, like I would if I were a kid having to clean her room or brush her teeth. Why do I think it has to be a bad experience?

All the things I put off until I THINK I’ll have time for them!

I realized that I made that up. It doesn’t have to be that way! By putting things off, the pile would only get higher and then I’d have a bunch of anxious thoughts about what needed to get done that I wasn’t doing. I would never consider if my state of mind was calm and if not, just go to a calm mind, and pick up the phone. In a calm mind, it was easy to make the choice to enjoy my time with customer service. Why not?

This insight came to me as I hung up the phone with an AT&T technician in Kentucky, named Samantha.We had a lovely time joking about how we all need a college degree in “Satellite Internet/TV remotely controlled interchange/exchange,” and a minor in cyber phonics —  we laughed; the whole thing was a pleasant exchange.

New technology can connect phone lines to TV and probably other mobile devices as well. I enjoyed moving through all the internet windows, with Samantha’s guidance, to find the page that showed me my incoming calls because the number I thought I heard on my voice mail was not a working number.

Since you can’t leave breadcrumbs on the internet, I had no idea how I would ever be able to retrace those steps without an AT&T technician on the other end of a phone line. I couldn’t help but wonder how long it took Samantha to learn all that.

I complimented her on her skills to which she told me a story about an ER Surgeon who was similarly amazed that he could do what he does by day and be completely stumped at night by a TV and a remote controller.

I commented that we all need one another and as our society becomes ever more complicated, we need one another even more. There is no individual human brain that can do it all. Even Einstein would probably need some technical assistance in today’s world.

Complicated societies require the expertise of many people. New jobs will have to be created for all the new details of modern day life. That remark seemed like a no-brain er to Samantha and me, yet a roomful of politicians may not draw the same conclusion. I wish I had asked her how long it took to learn her job and what her salary was and what her age was, but that would not be socially acceptable — or would it? In future generations perhaps it will. I chose to stick with my conditioned viewpoint that those questions would not be socially acceptable and I didn’t want Samantha to think I was prying.

She also led me through a series of steps that began at the Start button, cascaded to Control Panel and then to Internet Networking — behind that door lays the answer to the question: How many bars do you have? I know I’m being a bit glib right now since most people are quite familiar with this and in fact if I keep going you’ll know my age — or at least within 5 years of my age. I know a little but not nearly enough to keep up with the pace of technology today.

A friend warned me a couple of years ago, saying, “you’d better keep up with technology or you’ll be a dinosaur like the older CEO’s who refuse to learn as though they are better than that, and are meanwhile being replaced by their younger, tech savvy, employees.” The world has changed at warp speed; we can fight it, grin and bare it, or embrace it — the choice is ours to make. We have the free will to think anything we want.

We joked about how we can be on hold for 1/2 an hour and once someone actually picks up we’re then led through a maze, trying to figure out how to word the question, never mind figure out what the answer means.

Samantha told a story about an 80-year-old woman she tried to guide through a series of steps and the degree of patience it required because the woman could barely get beyond turning the thing to the ON position. Heavens, where will the world be when I turn 80? I had better keep up, or at the very least stay friendly with the Samantha’s of the world — they rule!

I wrote down Sam’s info so I could give her a good review for her calm effort with me.
Samantha  SL486N

 

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Feelings: Where Do They Really Come From? – Dicken Bettinger

As students of The Three Principles of Thought, Consciousness, and Mind we are reminded of the fact that we are always living exclusively in a world of our own thinking.  We also learn that each and every thought we have creates a feeling.  All of us have moments when we don’t realize this fact and we mistakenly believe that something other than thought is creating our feelings.  We suffer from a common misunderstanding of believing our feeling comes from something other than thought.  Again, this is a misunderstanding.  We may believe that a deadline is causing us stress; the traffic is making us upset, our spouse is bothering us, or that the sun coming out is making us feel good.  As soon as we disconnect thought from feeling we begin to connect our feelings to something in the outside world.  And whatever we connect it to, e.g. the deadline, the traffic, our spouse, the weather, we will continue to do a lot of thinking about this perceived problem or issue or idea.  This kind of thinking often continues to generate even more preoccupation, stress, or upset.  And, as you will see, all of this thinking is based on a simple misunderstanding that keeps us from getting new thinking or solutions to our problems.

As we realize for ourselves that our feelings are coming from our thinking, we have more and more moments of actually experiencing the truth of this fact.  This realization corrects the misunderstanding that our feelings are coming from anything other than thought.  It wakes us up to the present moment.  And when we stand in the present moment our mind chatter quiets down on its own, and this space in our minds allows for greater access to new thinking.  The more often we realize this fact -- that we are feeling our thinking -- the more our minds settle down and the more we experience the benefits that are bi-products of this understanding:  new thinking popping into our minds.  It is new thinking that gives rise to our insights; creativity, new ideas, greater understanding, learning, common sense and these thoughts create feelings of peace, joy and love.

This understanding of the inside-out nature of thought-created feeling and experience helps us to realize the fact that new thinking is always possible.  Our minds are a limitless potential for new thinking and all of us have experienced how a new thought can shift our feelings and perspective when we are feeling stuck.

It is humbling to realize that all of us, with no exception, get lost in those moments when we misunderstand where our feelings are coming from and act as if the world has created what we are feeling.  But it is up-lifting to learn that we all operate exactly the same way and that we can all develop greater awareness of how we live in a thought-created world.